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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Washington, D.C. » National Arboretum » Floral and Nursery Plants Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345586

Research Project: Evaluation and Genetic Improvement of Woody Ornamental Landscape Plants for Disease and Pest Tolerance, Non-Invasiveness, and Ornamental Traits

Location: Floral and Nursery Plants Research

Title: American Elm clones of importance in DED tolerance studies

Author
item HAUGEN, LINDA - Forest Service (FS)
item Bentz, Susan

Submitted to: Forest Service Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/22/2017
Publication Date: 9/26/2017
Citation: Haugen, L.M., Bentz, S.E. 2017. American Elm clones of importance in DED tolerance studies. Forest Service Meeting. https://doi.org/10.2737/NRS-GR-P-174.

Interpretive Summary: Dutch elm disease (DED) is a destructive disease of American elm that has had a tremendous impact on both urban landscapes and natural ecosystems. Despite the impact of DED, planting of American elms continues to be of interest in urban and forest settings, so it is critical that DED-resistant selections be identified. Scientists from ARS, the Forest Service, and Universities collaborated at a workshop in October 2016 to identify selections of American elm that are commercially available or are of interest for research on DED tolerance in the United States. The resulting list of 22 selections provides a concise summary of the characteristics and background of these clones and includes information on origin, ploidy level, availability in the nursery trade, evidence of DED tolerance, and growth form. References provide additional documentation for DED researchers.

Technical Abstract: We present the background and characteristics of American elm clones that are commercially available or of interest in research on Dutch elm disease (DED) tolerance in the United States. The characteristics of interest include origin, ploidy level, whether available in nursery trade, evidence of DED tolerance, and other comments. The list includes 10 named commercially available cultivars, six additional named American elms of interest, and six numbered clones of interest.