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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Urbana, Illinois » Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345408

Research Project: Integrated Management of Soybean Pathogens and Pests

Location: Soybean/maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research

Title: Dispersal records of the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), through the Midwest Suction Trap Network

Author
item Lagos-kutz, Doris
item Voegtlin, David - University Of Illinois
item Davis, Jeffrey - Louisiana State University Agcenter
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/9/2018
Publication Date: 9/1/2018
Citation: Lagos-Kutz, D.M., Voegtlin, D., Davis, J., Hartman, G.L. 2018. Dispersal records of the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), through the Midwest Suction Trap Network. Florida Entomologist. 101(3):508-510. doi.org/10.1653/024.101.0310.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1653/024.101.0310

Interpretive Summary: The sugarcane aphid, is an exotic species in the United States that was first reported in Florida in 1978 and in Louisiana in 2001. Its distribution has expanded to many south-eastern and central states, and has been a major concern for sorghum production in Texas and some surrounding states since 2013. In our study, based on the Midwest Suction Trap Network, we found new records of dispersal in 2015, 2016, and 2017 with some catches as far north as northern Wisconsin. This species is a threat to sorghum and potential other cereal and energy crops of economic importance. This information is useful for researchers, extension agents, and producers that are interested in the sugarcane aphid and dispersal of aphids and insects in general across the crop production areas in the United States.

Technical Abstract: Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), the sugarcane aphid, is an exotic species in the United States. This species is a threat to crops of economic importance, like sorghum and sugarcane, and monitoring its dispersal is necessary to document its geographic range. Based on trap catches through the Midwest Suction Trap Network, the sugarcane aphid arrived late in the growing season in the northern states including counts from northern Wisconsin. We will continue monitor for this species through the Midwest Suction Trap Network and keep researchers, extension agents, and producers aware of the dispersal of this crop threatening aphid species.