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ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Forage and Livestock Production Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345255

Research Project: Integrated Forage Systems for Food and Energy Production in the Southern Great Plains

Location: Forage and Livestock Production Research

Title: An integrated modeling framework for investigating water management practices in the ogallala aquifer region

Author
item Gowda, Prasanna
item Bailey, Ryan - Colorado State University
item Kisekka, Isaya - University Of California, Davis
item Lin, Xiaomao - Kansas State University
item Schipanski, Meagan - Colorado State University
item Kremen, Amy - Colorado State University

Submitted to: Grazinglands Research Laboratory Miscellaneous Publication
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/15/2017
Publication Date: 11/1/2017
Citation: Gowda, P., Bailey, R., Kisekka, I., Lin, X., Schipanski, M., Kremen, A. 2017. An integrated modeling framework for investigating water management practices in the ogallala aquifer region. Colorado Water. p. 36-37.

Interpretive Summary: The Ogallala aquifer region (OAR) currently accounts for 30% of total crop and animal production in the U.S. More than 90% of the water pumped from the Ogallala aquifer is used for irrigated agriculture in this region. Consequently, groundwater levels in the Ogallala aquifer are rapidly declining. However, to date we have lacked an effective means of assessing possible water, land use, soil and agronomic scenarios that might extend the life of our shared groundwater resources. As part of the USDA-NIFA funded Coordinated Agricultural Project, efforts are made to integrate scientific knowledge across disciplines to develop a comprehensive modeling framework that can be used to evaluate the effect of alternative crop, soil and water management strategies on groundwater demand and availability in the OAR under temporal and spatial climate variability, with an overarching goal of sustaining food production systems, rural communities, and ecosystem services in the region. This article briefly presents an integrated modeling framework for agricultural water management in the OAR. It consists cropping system model, linked to watershed hydrology and groundwater hydrology models with an aim of retaining the strength of each model. This integrated modeling framework is expected to provide important guidance for groundwater management groups seeking to evaluate the potential water use and agricultural production impacts of management and policy options. In addition, it could be applied to other irrigated groundwater systems worldwide.

Technical Abstract: The Ogallala aquifer region (OAR) currently accounts for 30% of total crop and animal production in the U.S. More than 90% of the water pumped from the Ogallala aquifer is used for irrigated agriculture in this region. Consequently, groundwater levels in the Ogallala aquifer are rapidly declining. However, to date we have lacked an effective means of assessing possible water, land use, soil and agronomic scenarios that might extend the life of our shared groundwater resources. As part of the USDA-NIFA funded Coordinated Agricultural Project, efforts are made to integrate scientific knowledge across disciplines to develop a comprehensive modeling framework that can be used to evaluate the effect of alternative crop, soil and water management strategies on groundwater demand and availability in the OAR under temporal and spatial climate variability, with an overarching goal of sustaining food production systems, rural communities, and ecosystem services in the region. This article briefly presents an integrated modeling framework for agricultural water management in the OAR. It consists cropping system model, linked to watershed hydrology and groundwater hydrology models with an aim of retaining the strength of each model. This integrated modeling framework is expected to provide important guidance for groundwater management groups seeking to evaluate the potential water use and agricultural production impacts of management and policy options. In addition, it could be applied to other irrigated groundwater systems worldwide.