Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345055

Research Project: Integrated Disease Management of Exotic and Emerging Plant Diseases of Horticultural Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: The effects of cultivar, production system, and nursery on the composition of the rhizosphere microbiome of cultivated rhododendrons in Oregon

Author
item Foster, Zachary - Oregon State University
item Weiland, Jerry
item Scagel, Carolyn
item Grunwald, Niklaus - Nik

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/15/2017
Publication Date: 12/1/2017
Citation: Foster, Z.S., Weiland, G.E., Scagel, C.F., Grunwald, N.J. 2017. The effects of cultivar, production system, and nursery on the composition of the rhizosphere microbiome of cultivated rhododendrons in Oregon [abstract]. Phytopathology. 107:S5.4. https://doi.org/10.1094/PHYTO-107-12-S5.1.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The composition of plant microbiomes influences important agricultural processes such as nutrient absorption and plant health. Plant genotype and environment affect the microbiome, but the nature and relative importance of these effects are not well understood. We evaluated the effect of host genotype, nursery, and production system (potted versus in-ground planting) on the composition of the fungal and oomycete rhizosphere microbiome of rhododendrons in Oregon nurseries. Rhizosphere and roots were sampled from randomly selected, potted and in-ground plants of 3 host cultivars at 4 nurseries. ITS1 amplicons were sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq. Sequences were clustered and assigned to taxa using vsearch. Organism trophic mode was inferred using the FUNGuild database. Diversity statistics, ordination plots, and heat trees were calculated in R with vegan and metacoder. There was little difference in alpha diversity between potted and in-ground plants, but nurseries that grew plants with both production systems had higher diversity overall. Cultivar did not account for observed differences in community composition; however, nursery and production system had a significant effect. Ordination results suggest that production system had the dominant effect on microbiome composition, followed by a moderate effect from nursery, and no effect from cultivar. Most fungal species were predicted to be saprotrophs (50%), followed by pathogens (12%) and symbionts (6%).