Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Genetic Improvement for Fruits & Vegetables Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344419

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Blueberry and Cranberry: Utilization of Genomic Resources and Phenotypic/Genotypic Characterization

Location: Genetic Improvement for Fruits & Vegetables Laboratory

Title: Genome-scale examination of NBS-encoding genes in blueberry

Author
item DIE, JOSE V - Universidad De Cordoba
item ROMAN, BELEN - Ifapa Centro Alameda Del Obispo
item QI, XINPENG - Oak Ridge Institute For Science And Education (ORISE)
item Rowland, Lisa

Submitted to: Scientific Reports
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/8/2018
Publication Date: 2/21/2018
Citation: Die, J., Roman, B., Qi, X., Rowland, L.J. 2018. Genome-scale examination of NBS-encoding genes in blueberry. Scientific Reports. 8:3429.

Interpretive Summary: Blueberry is an important crop worldwide. It is, however, susceptible to a variety of diseases, which can lead to losses in yield and fruit quality. Although screening studies have identified resistant breeding lines for some important diseases, still little is known about the molecular basis underlying that resistance. Disease resistance in plants is often determined by resistance (R) genes. The identification and characterization of such a specific resistance gene family in blueberry would enhance the foundation of knowledge needed for its genetic improvement. In this study, we searched for and found a total of approximately 100 specific disease resistance genes in the current blueberry genome. An examination of their structure by way of a family-tree analysis grouped these genes into two types. This study provides new insight into disease resistance genes in blueberry and is an important resource for scientists to use to help develop more disease resistant germplasm.

Technical Abstract: Blueberry is an important crop worldwide. It is, however, susceptible to a variety of diseases, which can lead to losses in yield and fruit quality. Although screening studies have identified resistant germplasm for some important diseases, still little is known about the molecular basis underlying that resistance. Disease resistance in plants is often determined by resistance (R) genes. The most predominant type of R-genes contain nucleotide binding site and leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) domains. The identification and characterization of such a gene family in blueberry would enhance the foundation of knowledge needed for its genetic improvement. In this study, we searched for and found a total of 106 NBS-encoding genes (including 97 NBS-LRR) in the current blueberry genome. The NBS genes were grouped into eleven distinct classes based on their domain architecture. More than 22% of the NBS genes are present in clusters. Ten of the genes were mapped onto seven linkage groups. Phylogenetic analysis grouped these genes into two major clusters based on their structural variation, the first cluster having toll and interleukin-1 like receptor (TIR) domains and most of the second cluster containing a coiled-coil domain. Our study provides new insight into the NBS gene family in blueberry and is an important resource for the identification of functional R-genes.