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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Crop Bioprotection Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344166

Research Project: New Ovicidal Microbial Agents for the Biological Control of Mosquitoes

Location: Crop Bioprotection Research

Title: Advances in insect physiology. Progress in mosquito research

Author
item Ramirez, Jose

Submitted to: Quarterly Review of Biology
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/11/2017
Publication Date: 12/1/2017
Citation: Ramirez, J.L. 2017. Advances in insect physiology. Progress in mosquito research. Quarterly Review of Biology. 92:483-484. https://doi.org/10.1086/694989.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1086/694989

Interpretive Summary: Mosquitoes are one of the most important arthropod vectors, responsible for the transmission of pathogens such as dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses, and the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. This book provides an excellent overview of the recent advances in mosquito biology. This volume encompasses 13 chapters from 32 contributing authors who are renown leaders in mosquito research. Topics range from advances in gene editing, sex determination and adaptation, juvenile hormoneand regulation of reproductive processes, peptide hormones, small RNAs and the complement system, and mosquito-microbiome interactions. It also touches on topics such as the mosquito sensory system and physiology of diapause and renal excretory processes in mosquitoes.

Technical Abstract: This book review briefly summarizes the most interesting topics/chapters from the book: "Advances in Insect Physiology: Progress in mosquito Research". The book is an excellent overview of the recent advances in mosquito biology. This volume encompasses 13 chapters from 32 contributing authors who are renown leaders in mosquito research. The book provides a series of images in black and white within the text and in color at the back of the book. The book opens up with a chapter on the recent advancements on mosquito transgenesis and then touches on on other important topics in mosquito research such as sensory system, reproduction, immunity and circadian clocks. Most of the chapters provide description to their current o potential integration into mosquito control strategies, making this book amenable not only for student and scientist working in mosquito biology but also those working in mosquito control.