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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Chemistry Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343898

Research Project: Insect, Nematode, and Plant Semiochemical Communication Systems

Location: Chemistry Research

Title: Comparison of trap types, placement, and colors for monitoring Anthonomus musculus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults in highbush blueberries

Author
item Silva, Diego - Rutgers University
item Kyryczenko-roth, Vera - Rutgers University
item Alborn, Hans
item Rodriguez-saona, Cesar - Rutgers University

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/12/2018
Publication Date: 2/28/2018
Citation: Silva, D., Kyryczenko-Roth, V., Alborn, H.T., Rodriguez-Saona, C. 2018. Comparison of trap types, placement, and colors for monitoring Anthonomus musculus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) adults in highbush blueberries. Journal of Insect Science. 18(2):1-9. https://doi.org/10.1093/jisesa/iey005.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jisesa/iey005

Interpretive Summary: Cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus Say (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a key pest of highbush blueberries in the northeast USA. In this study a scientist at the chemistry group, USDA ARS Gainesville FL in collaboration with scientists at Rutgers University evaluated the efficacy of various commercially-available traps, designed for other weevil species, in capturing A. musculus adults. We also tested whether trap placement within the blueberry canopy affects adult captures, and determined the effect of sticky trap color on weevil captures. The results were compared with standard beating sheet collections. We found that most A. musculus adults were caught on yellow or white sticky traps and that most adults were captured when yellow sticky traps were placed at the bottom half of the blueberry canopy. Although most weevils were caught on colored traps late in the season (summer adult generation), the low number of overwintered adults caught on the traps early in the season did not correlate well with the standard procedure population estimate. Although our study for the first time identified traps that can be used without kairomones to capture summer season A. musculus adults, these traps need to be combined with attractive semiochemicals to capture overwintered adults during early season infestation of highbush blueberry fields.

Technical Abstract: Cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus Say (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a key pest of highbush blueberries in the northeast USA. To date, however, no trapping system has been developed to successfully monitor this pest. In 2012-2014, studies were conducted in commercial blueberry farms in New Jersey (USA) to: 1) evaluate the efficacy of various commercially-available traps, designed for other weevil species, in capturing A. musculus adults, 2) test whether trap placement within the blueberry canopy affects adult captures, and 3) determine the effects of different colored sticky traps on weevil captures. For a comparison with existing techniques, we monitored the number of overwintered adult weevils on blueberry bushes using beating sheets. Of all traps and colors tested we found that most A. musculus adults were caught on yellow or white sticky traps and that most adults were captured when yellow sticky traps were placed at the bottom half of the blueberry canopy. Most weevils were caught on colored traps late in the season (summer adult generation); and the number of overwintered adults caught on traps did not correlate with those on bushes. Although our study for the first time identified traps that can be used to capture A. musculus adults, these traps alone (without semiochemicals) have limited applicability for monitoring overwintered adult weevils in highbush blueberries.