Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343819

Research Project: Productive Cropping Systems Based on Ecological Principles of Pest Management

Location: Integrated Cropping Systems Research

Title: Infestation ratings database for soybean aphid on early-maturity wild soybean lines

Author
item Hesler, Louis
item Tilmon, K - The Ohio State University

Submitted to: Data in Brief
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/5/2017
Publication Date: 9/12/2017
Citation: Hesler, L.S., Tilmon, K.J. 2017. Infestation ratings database for soybean aphid on early-maturity wild soybean lines. Data in Brief. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2017.09.012.

Interpretive Summary: Soybean aphid is a major invasive pest of soybean in northern production regions of North America. Although insecticides are currently the main method for controlling this pest, soybean aphid-resistant cultivars are being developed to sustainably manage soybean aphid in the future. The viability of soybean aphid-resistant cultivars may depend on identifying a diverse set of resistance genes from screening various germplasm sources, including wild soybean, the ancestral plant line of cultivated soybean. Data consisted of infestation ratings generated for a total of 337 distinct plant introduction lines of wild soybean that were exposed to soybean aphid biotype 1 for 14 days each in 25 separate tests. Individual plants of the test lines were given a common rating by two researchers, based on a rating scale that progressed from 1 = 0 to 50, 2 = 51 to 100, 3 = 101 to 150, 4 = 151 to 200, 5 = 201 to 250, and 6 with more than 250 soybean aphid per test plant. Resistant lines were identified among the 337 test lines. Public dissemination of this dataset will allow for further analyses and evaluation of resistance among the test lines.

Technical Abstract: Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura; SA) is a major invasive pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in northern production regions of North America. Although insecticides are currently the main method for controlling this pest, SA-resistant cultivars are being developed to sustainably manage SA in the future. The viability of SA-resistant cultivars may depend on identifying a diverse set of resistance genes from screening various germplasm sources, including wild soybean (Glycine soja Siebold and Zucc.), the progenitor of cultivated soybean. Data consisted of infestation ratings generated for a total of 337 distinct plant introduction lines of wild soybean that were exposed to avirulent SA biotype 1 for 14 d in 25 separate tests. Individual plants of the test lines were given a common rating by two researchers, based on a rating scale that progressed from 1 = 0 to 50, 2 = 51 to 100, 3 = 101 to 150, 4 = 151 to 200, 5 = 201 to 250, and 6 with >250 SA per test plant. Public dissemination of this dataset will allow for further analyses and evaluation of resistance among the test lines.