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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343275

Research Project: Control Strategies and Evaluation of the Microbial Ecology Associated with Foodborne Pathogens and Poultry Processing

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research

Title: Neutralization of residual antimicrobial processing chemicals in broiler carcass rinse for improved detection of Campylobacter

Author
item Berrang, Mark
item Gamble, Gary
item Hinton, Jr, Arthur
item JOHNSON, JOHN - Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS)

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/22/2017
Publication Date: 2/7/2018
Citation: Berrang, M.E., Gamble, G.R., Hinton Jr, A., Johnson, J. 2018. Neutralization of residual antimicrobial processing chemicals in broiler carcass rinse for improved detection of Campylobacter. Journal of Applied Poultry Research. doi:10.3382/japr/pfx071.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3382/japr/pfx071

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter is a human pathogen that may be present on chicken carcasses and meat products. Poultry processors may apply antimicrobial processing aids as a spray or immersion to lower contamination on carcasses. In the U.S., broiler carcasses are generally sampled by whole carcass rinse and the potential exists for residual levels of antimicrobial processing aid to be carried over into the rinsate. It has been shown that such carry-over can interfere with the detection of Salmonella. In the current study, we demonstrate that carry-over of antimicrobial treatment can also interfere with the detection and recovery of Campylobacter in broiler carcass rinse samples. We found that the traditional rinse medium (buffered peptone water) did not offer enough neutralizing capability to counter act residual antimicrobial activity of peroxyacetic acid, cetylpyridinium chloride, acidified sodium chloride or a blend of acids to allow full recovery of Campylobacter. A recently reported formulation for a neutralizing buffered peptone water out performed the traditional carcass rinse medium and allowed significantly improved recovery of Campylobacter even in the presence of these antimicrobial processing aids. Performance of the new carcass rinse medium with a fourth antimicrobial (acidified sodium chloride) was no different than the traditional formulation. Neutralizing buffered peptone water represents a significant improvement in the broiler carcass rinse method for detection of Campylobacter.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter presence on broiler carcasses in the U.S. is regulated. Processors may apply antimicrobial processing aids as a spray or immersion to lower contamination on carcasses. In the U.S., broiler carcasses are generally sampled by whole carcass rinse and the potential exists for residual levels of antimicrobial processing aid to be carried over into the rinsate. It has been shown that such carry-over can interfere with the detection of Salmonella. In the current study, we demonstrate that carry-over of antimicrobial treatment can also interfere with the detection and recovery of Campylobacter in broiler carcass rinse samples. We tested traditional buffered peptone water and found that it did not offer enough neutralizing capability to counter act residual antimicrobial activity of some processing aids (peroxyacetic acid, cetylpyridinium chloride, acidified sodium chloride or a blend of acids) to allow full recovery of Campylobacter. A recently reported formulation for a neutralizing buffered peptone water out performed the traditional carcass rinse medium and allowed significantly improved recovery of Campylobacter even in the presence of three of the four tested antimicrobial processing aids. Performance of the new carcass rinse medium with the fourth antimicrobial (acidified sodium chloride) was no different than the traditional formulation. Neutralizing buffered peptone water represents a significant improvement in the broiler carcass rinse method for detection of Campylobacter.