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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342723

Research Project: Classical Biological Control of Insect Pests of Crops, Emphasizing Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Spotted Wing Drosophila and Tarnished Plant Bug

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Access and benefit sharing: Best practices for the use and exchange of invertebrate biological control agents

Author
item Barratt, Barbara - Ag Research Limited
item Mason, P - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Cock, Matthew - Center For Agricultural Bioscience International, Cabi
item Klapwijk, Johannette - Koppert Bv
item Van Lenteren, Joop - Wageningen University
item Brodeur, Jacques - Universite De Montreal
item Hoelmer, Kim
item Heimpel, George - University Of Minnesota

Submitted to: International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/6/2017
Publication Date: 9/11/2017
Citation: Barratt, B.I., Mason, P.G., Cock, M.J., Klapwijk, J., Van Lenteren, J.C., Brodeur, J., Hoelmer, K.A., Heimpel, G.E. 2017. Access and benefit sharing: Best practices for the use and exchange of invertebrate biological control agents. International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods. pp. 71-74.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) acknowledges the sovereign rights that countries have over their ‘genetic resources’. The Nagoya Protocol that came into force in 2014 provides a framework for implementation of and equitable process by which access to, and sharing of benefits between donor and recipient countries can take place. Biological control is an important and environmentally preferred management option for invasive insect pests and weeds. Biological control agents are included as genetic resources. Implementation of new international regulations governing exchange of genetic materials impacts the availability of candidate biocontrol agents, and exchange policies need to be carefully drafted. The International Organization of Biological Control recommendations of Best Practice include: collaborations to encourage information exchange about what agents are available and where they may be obtained; knowledge sharing through freely available databases that document successes (and failures); cooperative research to develop local capacity in less developed source countries; and transfer of production technology to provide opportunities for small-scale economic activity.