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ARS Home » Plains Area » Houston, Texas » Children's Nutrition Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342622

Research Project: Pediatric Clinical Nutrition

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: How maternal malnutrition affects linear growth and development in the offspring

Author
item Papathakis, Peggy - California Polytechnic State University
item Singh, Lauren - Washington University School Of Medicine
item Manary, Mark - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)

Submitted to: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/22/2016
Publication Date: 11/5/2016
Citation: Papathakis, P.C., Singh, L.N., Manary, M.J. 2016. How maternal malnutrition affects linear growth and development in the offspring. Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. 435:40-47.

Interpretive Summary: Malnutrition during pregnancy and lactation is widespread especially in low and middle income countries and can lead to unfavorable outcomes in both mother and infant. This research focused on identifying evidence and literature on interventions or solutions aimed at addressing maternal malnutrition and revealed that there is limited exploration and evidence that specifically addresses the impact of food/nutrient supplements on infant growth in undernourished pregnant women in the developing world. The research emphasizes that there is a demand for information focused on treating, diagnosing, and preventing undernutrition during pregnancy in order to improve outcomes suggest as linear growth and development in offspring.

Technical Abstract: Maternal malnutrition is common in the developing world and has detrimental effects on both the mother and infant. Pre-pregnancy nutritional status and weight gain during pregnancy are positively related to fetal growth and development. Internationally, there is no agreement on the method of diagnosis or treatment of moderate or severe malnutrition during pregnancy. Establishing clear guidelines for diagnosis and treatment will be essential in elevating the problem. Possible anthropometric measurements used to detect and monitor maternal malnutrition include pre-pregnancy BMI, weight gain, and mid upper arm circumference. Food supplements have the potential to increase gestational weight gain and energy intake which are positively associated with fetal growth and development. Overall more studies are needed to conclude the impact of food/nutrient supplements on infant growth in undernourished pregnant women in developing countries. Currently, a study underway may provide much needed documentation of the benefits of treating malnutrition in pregnancy.