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ARS Home » Plains Area » Houston, Texas » Children's Nutrition Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342604

Research Project: Developmental Determinants of Obesity in Infants and Children

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops

Author
item Wu, Qingyu - Kansas State University
item Yang, Jian - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Cheng, Ninghui - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Hirschi, Kendal - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item White, Frank - University Of Florida
item Park, Sunghun - Kansas State University

Submitted to: Environmental and Experimental Botany
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/21/2017
Publication Date: 4/25/2017
Citation: Wu, Q., Yang, J., Cheng, N., Hirschi, K.D., White, F.F., Park, S. 2017. Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops. Environmental and Experimental Botany. 139:91-98.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Plant growth, development, and response to environmental stress require the judicious balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are a group of oxidoreductases that participate in the control of ROS and are traditionally defined as redox regulators. New studies suggest the members of the GRX family may be involved in more biological processes than previously ascribed. While the core structure of GRX proteins are similar, localization and expression differences afford a multiplicity of functions between species and individual isoforms. Emerging evidence indicates that various plant monothiol GRXs perform diverse functions, including transcriptional regulation of defense responses, flower development, oxidative stress response, redox signaling, hormonal regulation, iron homeostasis, and environmental adaptation. This review highlights the recent progress in our understanding of the roles played by class II CGFS-type and class III CC-type GRXs in plant development, abiotic stress adaptation, iron homeostasis, and crop productivity. In particular, the abiotic stress tolerance functions of class II GRXs make them attractive targets for genetic engineering, potentially providing enhancements in salt, drought, heavy metal, and temperature stress responses.