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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342469

Research Project: Nutrition, Brain, and Aging

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells

Author
item Zheng, Tong - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Bielinski, Donna - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Fisher, Derek
item Shukitt-hale, Barbara
item Reynolds, Brent - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Steindler, Dennis - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Society for Neuroscience Abstracts and Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/22/2017
Publication Date: 11/11/2017
Citation: Zheng, T., Bielinski, D., Fisher, D.R., Shukitt Hale, B., Reynolds, B., Steindler, D. 2017. In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts and Proceedings. Program #667.14.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Neural stem cells have the capacity to respond to their environment, migrate to the injury site and generate functional cell types, and thus they hold great promise for cell therapies. In addition to representing a source for central nervous system (CNS) repair, neural stem and progenitor cells also show great promise for drug screening and toxicity testing. We propose that human neural stem/progenitor cells can also be utilized as a reliable in vitro bioassay model for testing, in addition to standard of care and emerging therapies, diet and nutrient components that have potential beneficial bioactions on both the developing and aging human CNS. Adult human neural progenitor cells (AHNPs) isolated and characterized previously in our lab, demonstrate impressive ability to generate diverse neuronal populations. They are used here as an in vitro model for testing the effects of Epidiferphane™ (EDP) on progenitor cell’s viability, proliferation and differentiation. EDP is a combination of phytochemicals incorporating green tea catechin epigallocatechin gallate, “EGCG”, the polyphenol curcumin from turmeric, and the isothiocyanate sulforaphane from broccoli sprouts. These nutrient components, together constituting a polymolecular botanical drug, are non-toxic and have demonstrated anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory as well as anti-oxidant properties. AHNPs were cultured in uncoated plastic dishes in N2 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum, bovine pituitary extract and growth factors. They were then treated with various doses of EGCG, curcumin and broccoli sprouts, either separately or in combination for 4 days. The viability of the treated cells was examined using the Trypan Blue exclusion method, and proliferation of these cells was evaluated using the ethynyl-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay. A subset of treated cells was labeled with a battery of neuronal markers to examine the differentiation of these cells. To determine whether EDP or its individual compounds could protect AHNPs from stress induced by dopamine (DA) present in the media, some pre-treated cells were exposed to DA for 2 hours and their viability, proliferation as well as calcium buffering were then examined. While EDP as well as its individual components did not show significant effects on the viability, proliferation and differentiation of AHNPs, they were able to revive the decrease in cell viability as well as proliferation rate following cellular stress induced by DA, which indicates their potential neuroprotective effect on AHNPs. The data also supports the notion that synergetic effects from the whole compound appear to be more protective when compared to each of the individual components in this human neural progenitor cell bioassay.