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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Reno, Nevada » Great Basin Rangelands Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342302

Research Project: Invasive Species Assessment and Control to Enhance Sustainability of Great Basin Rangelands

Location: Great Basin Rangelands Research

Title: Restoring Degraded Rangelands in Jordan: Optimizing Mechanized Micro-Water Harvesting Technique Using Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

Author
item STROHMEIRE, STEFAN - INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN THE DRY AREAS (ICARDA)
item HADDAD, MIRA - INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN THE DRY AREAS (ICARDA)
item DEVRIES, JOB - INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN THE DRY AREAS (ICARDA)
item SABRA, MUNA - INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN THE DRY AREAS (ICARDA)
item OBEIDAT, EIYLAF - INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN THE DRY AREAS (ICARDA)
item NOUWAPKO, SAYJRO - UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
item Weltz, Mark

Submitted to: World Conference Soil and Water Conservation Under Global Change (CONSOWA)
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/25/2017
Publication Date: 6/12/2017
Citation: Strohmeire, S., Haddad, M., Devries, J., Sabra, M., Obeidat, E., Nouwapko, S.K., Weltz, M.A. 2017. Restoring Degraded Rangelands in Jordan: Optimizing Mechanized Micro-Water Harvesting Technique Using Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). World Conference Soil and Water Conservation Under Global Change (CONSOWA). 166.

Interpretive Summary: Continuous population growth, recent refugee movement and migration as well as boundary restrictions and their implications on the nomadic lifestyle are additive pressure on rangelands throughout the Middle East. In particular, overgrazing through increased livestock herds threatens the Jordanian rangelands – the so called Badia. Degradation of the native vegetation and soils harm the rainwater infiltration and retention and eventually accelerates surface runoff and erosion. Recently, various projects have been launched aiming at restoring the degraded ecosystems. The study demonstrates that The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) satisfactorily simulates surface runoff processes of a Jordanian rangeland (Badia) environment. Thus, RHEM can be used to predict surface water yields in water harvesting structures implemented across degraded Jordanian landscape using the Vallerani plow to develop micro-water catchments. A risk assessment approach will be developed considering variable thresholds of surface water yields, both minimum and maximum, as well as erosion and consequential sediment accumulation. This will support the decision making process for targeted Badia restoration efforts – towards a multi-criteria tool trading off shrub growth, soil conservation and biodiversity.

Technical Abstract: Continuous population growth, recent refugee movement and migration as well as boundary restrictions and their implications on the nomadic lifestyle are additive pressure on rangelands throughout the Middle East. In particular, overgrazing through increased livestock herds threatens the Jordanian rangelands – the so called Badia. Degradation of the native vegetation and soils harm the rainwater infiltration and retention and eventually accelerates surface runoff and erosion. Recently, various projects have been launched aiming at restoring the degraded ecosystems. The study demonstrates that The Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM) satisfactorily simulates surface runoff processes of a Jordanian rangeland (Badia) environment. Thus, RHEM can be used to predict surface water yields in water harvesting structures implemented across degraded Jordanian landscape using the Vallerani plow to develop micro-water catchments. A risk assessment approach will be developed considering variable thresholds of surface water yields, both minimum and maximum, as well as erosion and consequential sediment accumulation. This will support the decision making process for targeted Badia restoration efforts – towards a multi-criteria tool trading off shrub growth, soil conservation and biodiversity