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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342263

Research Project: Developing Climate Resilient Crop Systems through GxExM

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Tolerance of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) to postemergence applied broadleaf herbicides

Author
item Boydston, Rick
item NELSON, HOWARD - Central Washington Grain Growers

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/24/2017
Publication Date: 11/20/2017
Citation: Boydston, R.A., Nelson, H. 2017. Tolerance of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) to postemergence applied broadleaf herbicides. Weed Technology. 32(2):190-194. https://doi.org/10.1017/wet.2017.99.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/wet.2017.99

Interpretive Summary: Broadleaf weeds are typically controlled in chickpea with preemergence (PRE) herbicides that rely on timely rainfall for activation. When adequate or timely rainfall do not occur, broadleaf weeds escape control and can severly reduce chickpea yields and impede harvest operations. Chickpea producers have no postemergence (POST) applied herbicides labeled for broadleaf weed control, so are left with few economical options to control broadleaf weeds that escape PRE herbicides. Chickpea tolerance to POST applications of two broadleaf herbicides, acifluorfen and fomesafen, were tested at two sites in 2015 and three sites in 2016. An additional POST broadleaf herbicide, pyridate, was included in 2016 along with several tank mixes of pyridate with acifluofen and fomesafen. Chickpea injury was observed following applications of acifluorfen and fomesafen for 1 to 4 weeks after application. Pyridate applied POST did not significantly injure chickpeas. When pyridate was tank mixed with acifluorfen or fomesafen, chickpea injury increased, but chickpeas recovered and yields were not reduced. Despite early season visual injury, chickpea yield was similar among POST herbicide treatments in all site-years. If labeled on chickpeas, these three herbicides could improve control of broadleaf weeds that escape PRE herbicides and reduce weed related harvest losses.

Technical Abstract: Chickpea producers currently have no postemergence (POST) applied herbicides labeled for broadleaf weed control and rely heavily on preemergence (PRE) herbicides to manage weeds. Severe crop losses from broadleaf weed competition and harvest losses from weeds impeding harvest can occur when PRE herbicides perform poorly. Chickpea tolerance to POST applications of acifluorfen at 0.42 kg ai ha-1 and fomesafen at 0.28 kg ai ha-1 was tested at two sites in 2015. In 2016, both herbicides were tested on chickpeas when applied alone and in combination with pyridate at three sites. Acifluorfen and fomesafen injured chickpeas for 1 to 4 weeks after application. Pyridate applied POST did not significantly injure chickpeas. When pyridate was tank mixed with either acifluorfen or fomesafen, chickpea injury increased, but chickpeas recovered and yielded similar to nontreated checks or pyridate-treated plots. A low rate of metribuzin at 0.06 kg ai ha-1 tank mixed with pyridate had little impact on chickpea injury or weed control. In 2015, Russian thistle was controlled 89% by acifluorfen and 100% by fomesafen at Prosser and both herbicides controlled the weed only 63% at Wilbur. All herbicide treatments reduced broadleaf weed densities equally in 2016 at all sites. Despite early season visual injury, chickpea yield was similar among POST herbicide treatments in all site-years. If labeled for use in chickpeas, acifluorfen, fomesafen, and pyridate could improve control of broadleaf weeds that escape PRE herbicides benefiting chickpea producers.