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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Plant Pathology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342140

Research Project: Mitigating High Consequence Domestic, Exotic, and Emerging Diseases of Fruits, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: First report of tomato chlorotic spot virus in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and purslane (Portulaca oleracea) in Florida

Author
item Raid, R.n. - University Of Florida
item Allingham, J.r. - Agricare
item Funderburk, J.e. - University Of Florida
item Skarlinsky, T - Animal And Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
item Hutton, S.f. - University Of Florida
item Turechek, William
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/17/2017
Publication Date: 7/6/2017
Citation: Raid, R., Allingham, J., Funderburk, J., Skarlinsky, T., Hutton, S., Turechek, W., Adkins, S.T. 2017. First report of tomato chlorotic spot virus in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and purslane (Portulaca oleracea) in Florida. Plant Health Progress. 18:126-128. doi:10.1094/PHP-04-17-0027-BR.

Interpretive Summary: Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) has recently emerged in commercial vegetable and ornamental production in Florida. In this report, we document three new TCSV hosts in Florida. This information is important for growers, Extension personnel, crop consultants, and regulatory and research scientists in Florida and the Caribbean.

Technical Abstract: Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) has been recently detected in tomato, pepper, hoya and vinca in Florida. Observations of additional crops in 2016 and 2017 revealed TCSV-like symptoms. Testing of these symptomatic plants identified three new hosts of TCSV in Florida: sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum), purslane (Portulaca oleracea) and portulaca (Portulaca oleracea)