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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342094

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Supplementation of a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

Author
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Broadway, Paul
item Bass, Benjamin - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Animal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/20/2018
Publication Date: 12/18/2018
Citation: Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Broadway, P.R., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2018. Supplementation of a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs. Animal. 13:144-152.

Interpretive Summary: In the livestock industry, maintaining or improving the health of animals is of utmost importance as sick animals fail to grow and cost producers in time lost and medication costs. As we continue to select for lean growth and other production traits, particularly in the swine industry, producers are faced with a growing issue of reduced immune responsivity to pathogens. Varous pre-, para- and pro-biotics have been marketed to livestock producers for years, and products in swine have been demonstrated to alter various aspects of the innate immune response. Therefore, scientists with the Livestock Issues Research Unit and Diamond V collaborated to determine if one of these products, a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product (SynGenX), would alter the stress and acute phase response to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) challenge. Data from this study found that pigs supplemented with SynGenX had improved performance, reduced body temperature, and reduced stress and pro-inflammatory responses to the LPS challenge. Therefore, the data suggests that feeding SynGenX to newly-weaned pigs can attenuate the acute phase immune response to an LPS challenge. These data will be of interest to researchers in the field of immune physiology and nutritional supplementation, as well as swine producers.

Technical Abstract: This study determined whether feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a LPS challenge. Pigs were assigned to Control, SynGenX at 1 kg/MT (SGX1; Diamond V SynGenX™, Cedar Rapids, IA), and SynGenX at 2 kg/MT (SGX2) treatments and were challenged with LPS (25 µg/kg BW) on d 15. The SGX1 pigs had the greatest body weight at d 7, 14, and 18 (P<0.001). Pig ADG was greater in SGX1 and SGX2 from d 0 to d 14, yet was less from d 14 to d 18 compared to Control pigs (P<0.001). The change in intraperitoneal temperature was greater in Control pigs compared to supplemented pigs (P<0.01). Cortisol was reduced in SGX2 pigs from 2.5 to 4.5 h and at 5.5 and 6.5 h compared to SGX1 and/or Control pigs (P=0.006). White blood cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes were decreased (P<0.001) in SGX1 and SGX2 compared to Control pigs. Concentrations of TNF-a were reduced in SGX1 (P=0.04), yet increased in SGX2 pigs (P=0.01). The IFN-' response was delayed and decreased in SGX2 compared to Control and SGX1 pigs (P=0.02). The IL-6 response was decreased in both SGX1 and SGX2 compared to Control pigs (P=0.01). These data demonstrate that feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs can attenuate the APR to an LPS challenge.