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ARS Home » Plains Area » Lubbock, Texas » Cropping Systems Research Laboratory » Livestock Issues Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342089

Research Project: Improving Immunity, Health, and Well-Being in Cattle and Swine

Location: Livestock Issues Research

Title: Modulation of the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs supplemented with an all-natural saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product

Author
item Sanchez, Nicole
item Carroll, Jeffery - Jeff Carroll
item Broadway, Paul
item Bass, Benjamin - Diamond V Mills, Inc
item Frank, Jason - Diamond V Mills, Inc

Submitted to: Livestock Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/30/2017
Publication Date: 2/1/2018
Citation: Sanchez, N.C., Carroll, J.A., Broadway, P.R., Bass, B.E., Frank, J.W. 2018. Modulation of the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs supplemented with an all-natural saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product. Livestock Science. 208:1-4.

Interpretive Summary: Scientists at the Livestock Issues Research Unit and Diamond V collaborated on a study to determine whether feeding a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce the stress and innate immune responses following a provocative endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge. With new and changing regulations and pressure from consumers, the animal industry is in a progressive age of change. Producers are seeking alternatives to antibiotics in order to ensure continued growth and health of the animals under their care. Various products have demonstrated their ability to modulate the immune system. This study was designed to test one of those products. Weaned pigs were supplemented for 19 days with Original XPC, and were challenged with LPS on day 15. This study found that while supplementation with the XPC did not alter performance, it reduced circulating white blood cells, including neutrophils and lymphocytes, and reduced serum concentrations of two pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data demonstrate that feeding an all-natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to newly-weaned pigs modulates some aspects of the acute phase immune response to an LPS challenge without affecting performance. These data will be of interest to researchers in the field of immune physiology and nutritional supplementation, as well as swine producers.

Technical Abstract: This study was designed to determine if feeding a Saccharamyces cerevisiae fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce the stress and acute phase responses (APR) following an acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n = 20; 6.4 ± 0.2 kg BW) were obtained and transported to an environmentally-controlled nursery facility. Pigs were housed individually in pens with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were weighed upon arrival and assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (n = 10 pigs/treatment): 1) non-medicated starter diet (Control); 2) Control diet + Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product fed at 2 kg/MT (XPC; Diamond V Original XPC™, Cedar Rapids, IA). All pigs remained on their diets for 18 d. Pigs were anesthetized on d 7 and 14 for insertion of an intraperitoneal (IP) temperature recording device and jugular catheter, respectively. On d 15, pigs were challenged i.v. with LPS (25 µg/kg BW). Blood samples were collected at 0.5-h (serum) and 1-h (complete blood cell counts) intervals from -2 to 8 h and at 24 h relative to LPS administration at 0 h. Pigs and feeders were weighed on d 7, 14, and 18. There was no effect of treatment (P = 0.69) for BW, ADG, or feed disappearance, although an increase over time was observed (P < 0.01) for all parameters. Control pigs had greater (P = 0.03) white blood cell (15.4 vs. 11.9 ± 0.5 x 103 cells/µL), neutrophil (7.1 vs. 4.6 ± 0.3 x 103 cells/µL), and lymphocyte (7.4 vs. 6.6 ± 0.2 x 103 cells/µL) counts compared to XPC-supplemented pigs. Serum cortisol increased (P < 0.01) after LPS administration but was not affected by treatment (P = 0.92). There was a treatment effect (P = 0.002) for serum TNF-a and IL-6 such that concentrations were greater in XPC-supplemented pigs than Control pigs (116.5 ± 5.0 vs 90.9 ± 5.2 pg/mL TNF-a; 188.3 ± 13.4 vs. 133.4 ± 11.7 pg/mL IL-6; respectively) following LPS challenge. Administration of LPS increased IP temperature (P < 0.01) in all pigs, however, there was no effect of treatment (P = 0.12). These data demonstrate that feeding an all-natural Saccharamyces cerevisiae fermentation product to newly-weaned pigs modulates the APR to an LPS challenge without affecting cortisol or performance.