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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #341737

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Use of mixture designs to investigate contribution of minor sex pheromone components to trap catch of the carpenterworm moth, Chilecomadia valdiviana

Author
item Lapointe, Stephen
item Barros-parada, Wilson - University Of Talca
item Fuentes-contreras, Eduardo - University Of Talca
item Herrera, Heidy - Pontifical Catholic University Of Valparaiso
item Kinsho, Takeshi - Ajinomoto Company, Inc
item Miyake, Yuki - Ajinomoto Company, Inc
item Niedz, Randall
item Bergmann, Jan - Pontifical Catholic University Of Valparaiso

Submitted to: Journal of Chemical Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/9/2017
Publication Date: 11/22/2017
Citation: Lapointe, S.L., Barros-Parada, W., Fuentes-Contreras, E., Herrera, H., Kinsho, T., Miyake, Y., Niedz, R.P., Bergmann, J. 2017. Use of mixture designs to investigate contribution of minor sex pheromone components to trap catch of the carpenterworm moth, Chilecomadia valdiviana. Journal of Chemical Ecology. 43(11-12):1046-1055. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-017-0906-0.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10886-017-0906-0

Interpretive Summary: The carpenterworm is causing increasing levels of damage in tree and fruit crops in Chile. The larvae of this moth burrow into the wood causing direct damage and facilitate the entry of fungal diseases that reduce productivity, the value of the wood and can lead to tree death. Previous work on this species identified 5 chemicals (one major and 4 minor compounds) produced by the female moth in her pheromone glands. The major compound appeared to be the principle attractant of male moths of this species. We conducted research and determined that the major compound is the only male attractant operating in this species. This pheromone can be used to attract and kill the males and may be used to confuse the males to prevent mating, thereby reducing their populations without using toxic insecticides.

Technical Abstract: Five compounds previously identified from the female pheromone gland of the carpenterworm Chilecomadia valdiviana, a pest of tree and fruit crops in Chile, South America, were studied in field experiments. Previously, attraction of males by the major component was readily demonstrated while the role of the minor components was indeterminate. We used a mixture design to study the potential contribution of the four minor pheromone components to trap catch in field experiments. After systematically exploring the design space described by the 5 pheromone components, we conclude that the major pheromone component, (7Z,10Z)-7,10-hexadecadienal, is the single compound responsible for attraction of male moths in this species. The statistical problem of appropriate experiment design for addressing the problem of mixtures in chemical ecology is described. We present an analysis of mixture designs and response surface modeling and an explanation of why this approach is superior to commonly used but statistically inappropriate designs.