Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340861

Research Project: Management of Filth Flies

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research

Title: Improved capture of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) by placement of Knight Stick sticky fly traps protected by electric fence inside animal exhibit yards at the Smithsonian’s National Zoological Park

Author
item Hogsette, Jerome - Jerry
item Ose, Gregory - SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK

Submitted to: Journal of Zoo Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/28/2017
Publication Date: 9/28/2017
Citation: Hogsette, Jr, J.A., Ose, G.A. 2017. Improved capture of stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) by placement of Knight Stick sticky fly traps protected by electric fence inside animal exhibit yards at the Smithsonian’s National Zoological Park. Journal of Zoo Biology. doi:10.1002/zoo.21382.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/zoo.21382

Interpretive Summary: The stable fly is a blood-feeding pest of livestock and other animals. Traps have been used to survey stable flies and reduce populations. The Knight Stick trap is highly effective for catching stable flies and may catch more if limits on trap placement were relaxed. When working on stable fly control at the Smithsonian’s National Zoological Park, traps had to be placed around exhibit perimeters where efficacy was questionable. In 2016 permission was given to enclose traps in electric fence and place them inside exhibits close to animals. Traps inside of exhibits captured 5 times more stable flies than traps placed along exhibit perimeters. This provides increased relief from this pestiferous fly and greatly improves animal health and welfare.

Technical Abstract: The stable fly is a blood-feeding pest of livestock and other animals. Traps have been used to survey stable flies and reduce populations. The Knight Stick trap is highly effective for catching stable flies and may catch more if limits on trap placement were relaxed. When working on stable fly control at the Smithsonian’s National Zoological Park, traps had to be placed around exhibit perimeters where efficacy was questionable. In 2016 permission was given to enclose traps in electric fence and place them inside exhibits close to animals. Traps inside of exhibits captured 5 times more stable flies than traps placed along exhibit perimeters. This provides increased relief from this pestiferous fly and greatly improves animal health and welfare.