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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340547

Research Project: Systematics of Moths Significant to Biodiversity, Quarantine, and Control, with a Focus on Invasive Species

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transtilla (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) discovered in northeastern Mexico feeding on Sapindaceae

Author
item Lara-villalon, Manuel - University Of Victoria
item Vanoye-eligio, Venancio - University Of Victoria
item Solis, M
item Sanchez-ramos, Gerardo - University Of Victoria
item Chacon-hermandez, Julio - University Of Victoria

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/13/2017
Publication Date: 11/21/2017
Citation: Lara-Villalon, M., Vanoye-Eligio, V., Solis, M.A., Sanchez-Ramos, G., Chacon-Hermandez, J. 2017. The navel orangeworm, Amyelois transtilla (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) discovered in northeastern Mexico feeding on Sapindaceae. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 119(4):601-604.

Interpretive Summary: The navel orangeworm (NOW) is a notorious pest of many economically important fruit and seeds such as pistachios, oranges and peaches in the United States. In 2016 this species cost pistachio growers in the U.S. $100 million in losses and damage to almonds can cost growers up to hundreds of dollars per acre. Additionally, aflatoxin levels in almond kernals increase with NOW damage. This paper reports the discovery of NOW in northeastern Mexico on a new host in the soapberry plant family, but it is not considered a pest in northeastern Mexico. This report expands the host range for NOW and contributes to the identification of insects associated with commercial crops in northeastern Mexico.

Technical Abstract: Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the navel orangeworm, is an important pest of a wide variety fruits and their seeds. We discovered and report for the first time A. transitella feeding on Sapindaceae in wild populations of U. speciosa (Endl.) in northeastern Mexico. We provide photographs of the plant and the different stages of the moth. Although A. transitella is a pest in other areas, it is not considered a pest in northeastern Mexico.