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ARS Home » Midwest Area » East Lansing, Michigan » Sugarbeet and Bean Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340411

Research Project: Genetic Dissection of Traits for Sugar Beet Improvement

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Title: Genotype to phenotype association of betalain pigment production genes in beets

Author
item Blum, Jacob - Michigan State University
item Galewski, Paul - Michigan State University
item Mcgrath, J Mitchell - Mitch

Submitted to: Annual Beet Sugar Development Foundation Research Report
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/31/2017
Publication Date: 4/1/2017
Citation: Blum, J., Galewski, P., McGrath, J.M. 2017. Genotype to phenotype association of betalain pigment production genes in beets. Annual Beet Sugar Development Foundation Research Report. Denver, Colorado: Beet Sugar Development Foundation. [CD-ROM].

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Beta vulgaris L. (beets) use a family of pigments known as betalains instead of anthocyanins in order to produce color. The color produced depends on the concentration of betalain pigments present: a higher concentration of betacyanins leads to a darker red color while a higher concentration of betaxanthins creates a more yellow or orange color. Also, some subspecies of beets, such as sugar beets, contain almost no betalain pigments, which creates a stark contrast between beets that contain pigments and beets that do not. This contrast can be used in a form of phenotypic to genotypic association similar to a bulk segregant analysis in order to determine where on the genome pigment production genes are located. In order to perform the genotype-phenotype association, both genetic data and phenotypic data are required. The genotypic data included the California 869 (C869) genome assembly and marker recombination breakpoints within the mapping sugar by red (MSR) population. Using the MSR population, spectroscopy data was collected in order to determine the betacyanin and betaxanthin concentration as well as color intensity (LAB) data. Using the phenotypic data, the genetic data was grouped and a chi squared test was performed to locate the area on the C869 genome assembly where it is most likely that the pigment production genes are located. Current results show high significance within Linkage Groups 3 and 4 in both the betacyanin and betaxanthin concentration groups. It is possible to use other forms of genetic data in order to further establish the loci of pigment production genes, thus this experiment demonstrated the utility of the chosen approach.