Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340174

Research Project: Urban Small Farms and Gardens Pest Management

Location: Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory

Title: Accidental introductions of natural enemies: causes and implications

Author
item Weber, Donald
item Hajek, Ann - Cornell University - New York
item Hoelmer, Kim

Submitted to: International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/10/2017
Publication Date: 9/19/2017
Citation: Weber, D.C., Hajek, A.E., Hoelmer, K.A. 2017. Accidental introductions of natural enemies: causes and implications. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Biological Control of Arthropods, September 11-15, 2017; Langkawi, Malaysia. p. 2-5.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Accidental introductions of natural enemies, including parasitoid and predatory groups, may exceed species introduced intentionally. Several factors favor this: a general surge in international trade; lack of surveillance for species that are not associated with live plants or animals; inability to intercept tiny organisms such as scelionid parasitoids; huge invasive host populations in source and/or receiving areas that allow rapid establishment; and lack of aggressive screening for pests already established. Recent frequent and surprisingly rapid accidental natural enemy introductions call into question the regulatory emphasis on a rigorous and protracted process for classical biocontrol introductions, when adventives have a high probability to displace or disrupt this planned process.