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Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Small Grains for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Characterization of Pathogen Populations

Location: Plant Science Research

Title: Re-engineering of the Pm21 transfer from Haynaldia villosa to bread wheat by induced homoeologous recombination

Author
item LUKASZEWSKI, ADAM - University Of California
item Cowger, Christina

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/4/2017
Publication Date: 6/16/2017
Citation: Lukaszewski, A.J., Cowger, C. 2017. Re-engineering of the Pm21 transfer from Haynaldia villosa to bread wheat by induced homoeologous recombination. Crop Science. 57:1-5.

Interpretive Summary: Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, the cause of powdery mildew, can generate serious grain yield losses in wheat. To expand the range of resistance sources freely available to wheat breeders, a resistance gene Pm21, derived from the wild wheat relative Haynaldia villosa, was transferred to chromosome 6AS of common wheat. The genetic location of the new gene was different from that suggested by an earlier transfer by a different method. Wheat lines with two small inserts of Pm21 from H. villosa were tested with powdery mildew isolates and found to be completely resistant.

Technical Abstract: Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, the cause of powdery mildew, can generate serious grain yield losses in wheat. To expand the range of resistance genes freely available to wheat breeders, a Haynaldia villosa derived resistance gene Pm21 was transferred to chromosome 6AS of wheat by homoeologous recombination. The transfer showed that the genetic location of the locus was different from that suggested by an earlier transfer by irradiation. Wheat lines with two small intercalary inserts of H. villosa chromatin with Pm21 were tested with a range of powdery mildew isolates and found to be completely resistant (infection score of “0”).