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Research Project: New Strategies for Management of Invasive Ambrosia Beetles in Horticultural and Nursery Crops

Location: Application Technology Research

Title: Single and combination insecticides evaluated as regulatory immersion treatments to eliminate third-instar Japanese beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from small diameter field-grown and containerized nursery plants

Author
item Oliver, Jason - Tennessee State University
item Ranger, Christopher
item Reding, Michael - Mike
item Youssef, Nadeer - Tennessee State University
item Moyseenko, James - The Ohio State University

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/27/2017
Publication Date: 7/12/2017
Citation: Oliver, J., Ranger, C.M., Reding, M.E., Youssef, N., Moyseenko, J. 2017. Single and combination insecticides evaluated as regulatory immersion treatments to eliminate third-instar Japanese beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from small diameter field-grown and containerized nursery plants. Journal of Entomological Science. 52:274-287.

Interpretive Summary: Japanese beetles and their larvae are highly destructive and significant nursery regulatory pests. When shipping from infested states, growers must immerse field-grown balled and burlapped (B&B) plants or container-grown plants grown in a solution of chlorpyrifos or bifenthrin. The current study was conducted to evaluate new products and insecticide combinations for treatment purposes. The study objectives were to: (1) evaluate individual and combination insecticide treatments as potential regulatory dips against Japanese beetle larvae, and (2) determine the lowest effective rates. For B&B plants, all rates and insecticides reduced larval numbers compared with the untreated control plants. However, chlorantraniliprole, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and cyfluthrin + imidacloprid all had rates in one or more B&B tests with larval numbers exceeding industry standards. The flowable formulation of bifenthrin (Talstar® Nursery F) alone or in combination with imidacloprid or trichlorfon also exceeded industry standards at the lowest rates tested. All spring B&B tests met industry standards with the exception of one bifenthrin + trichlorfon treatment at the lowest rate tested. In all of the container tests, insecticide treatments and rates provided 100% larval control, with the exception of dinotefuran and bifenthrin + trichlorfon, which each had one low and one high rate that exceeded larval thresholds for the DJHP. Results from this study identifiend several individual and combination insecticide dips that provided acceptable control. These products have the potential for regulatory use.

Technical Abstract: Japanese beetles, Popillia japonica Newman, are a nursery regulatory pest. Immersion of field-grown plants harvested as balled and burlapped (B&B) or container plants grown in pine bark substrates in a solution of chlorpyrifos or bifenthrin is allowed for certification in the Domestic Japanese Beetle Harmonization Plan (DJHP). Study objectives were to: (1) evaluate individual and combination insecticide treatments as potential regulatory dips against third-instar P. japonica in 30-cm B&B and number 3 containers, and (2) determine the lowest effective rates. Tests were performed fall and spring from 2007 to 2010. For B&B, all rates and insecticides tested reduced larval numbers compared with the untreated check. However, chlorantraniliprole, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and cyfluthrin + imidacloprid all had rates in one or more B&B tests with larval numbers exceeding DJHP standards during fall tests. The flowable formulation of bifenthrin (Talstar® Nursery F) alone or in combination with imidacloprid or trichlorfon also exceeded DJHP standards at the lowest rates tested. All spring B&B tests met DJHP standards with the exception of one bifenthrin + trichlorfon treatment at the lowest rate tested. In all of the container tests, insecticide treatments and rates provided 100% larval control, with the exception of dinotefuran and bifenthrin + trichlorfon, which each had one low and one high rate that exceeded larval thresholds for the DJHP. Several individual and combination insecticide dips provided P. japonica control at DJHP standards and had potential for regulatory use.