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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #339421

Research Project: Improved Biologically-Based Tactics to Manage Invasive Insect Pests and Weeds

Location: Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research

Title: Mechanisms of resistance to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides in Asian citrus psyllid populations in Florida

Author
item Eason, Julius - Florida A & M University
item Kanga, Lambert - Florida A & M University
item Haseeb, Muhammad - Florida A & M University
item Qureshi, J - University Of Florida
item Legaspi, Jesusa - Susie

Submitted to: Current Investigations in Agriculture and Current Research(CIACR)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/14/2018
Publication Date: 2/14/2018
Citation: Eason, J., Kanga, L.H., Haseeb, M., Qureshi, J., Legaspi, J.C. 2018. Mechanisms of resistance to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides in Asian citrus psyllid populations in Florida. Current Investigations in Agriculture and Current Research(CIACR). 1(3):111.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid is the most devastating pest of citrus because it is the vector of “citrus greening” disease. Control of the Asian citrus psyllid has been hampered by the acquisition of resistance to organophosphorus and pyrethroid insecticides. The mechanisms by which this pest develops insecticide resistance are poorly understood. Scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology, Tallahassee, Florida, in collaboration with those at Center for Biological Control, Florida A&M University and University of Florida conducted a study to assess the mechanisms leading to the acquisition of various know types of resistance. An enhanced metabolic breakdown was shown for organophosphates as the result of increased esterase and carboxylesterase enzyme activities. However, resistance to pyrethroid was due to increases in glutathione-s-transferase and mixed function oxidase activities as well as altered target sites. The occurrence of multiple mechanisms of insecticide resistance found in Asian citrus psyllid populations suggest that synergist approaches may be used successfully to in the design of resistance management strategies thus limiting acquisition of insecticide resistance.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is the most devastating pest on citrus in Florida as it vectors a disease known as citrus greening. Florida is the largest citrus producer in the US and the development of insecticide resistance in ACP populations is a serious threat to the citrus industry. Mechanisms of resistance in ACP are not fully understood. Thus, in order to develop a resistance management program, the primary type of resistance must be determined. Here we conducted several studies to investigate the mechanisms of resistance to insecticides in ACP populations.