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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #339166

Research Project: Genomics, Nutrition, and Health

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Using genetic technologies to reduce, rather than widen, health disparities

Author
item SMITH, CAREN - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item FUILLERTON, STEPHANIE - University Of Washington
item DOOKERAN, KEITH - University Of Illinois
item HAMPEL, HEATHER - The Ohio State University
item TIN, ADRIENNE - Johns Hopkins University
item MARUTHUR, NISA - Johns Hopkins University
item SCHISLER, JONATHAN - University Of North Carolina
item HENDERSON, JEFFREY - Black Hills Center For American Indian Health
item TUCKER, KATHERINE - University Of Massachusetts
item ORDOVAS, JOSE - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: Health Affairs
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/1/2016
Publication Date: 8/1/2016
Citation: Smith, C.E., Fuillerton, S.M., Dookeran, K.A., Hampel, H., Tin, A., Maruthur, N.M., Schisler, J.C., Henderson, J.A., Tucker, K.L., Ordovas, J.M. 2016. Using genetic technologies to reduce, rather than widen, health disparities. Health Affairs. 35(8):1367-1373.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Evidence shows that both biological and nonbiological factors contribute to health disparities. Genetics, in particular, plays a part in how common diseases manifest themselves. Today, unprecedented advances in genetically based diagnoses and treatments provide opportunities for personalized medicine. However, disadvantaged groups may lack access to these advances, and treatments based on research on non-Hispanic whites might not be generalizable to members of minority groups. Unless genetic technologies become universally accessible, existing disparities could be widened. Addressing this issue will require integrated strategies, including expanding genetic research, improving genetic literacy, and enhancing access to genetic technologies among minority populations in a way that avoids harms such as stigmatization.