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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338955

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Field survey of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) infestations associated with six cultivars of Poncirus trifoliata

Author
item Hall, David
item Hentz, Matthew
item Stover, Ed

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/1/2017
Publication Date: 9/1/2017
Citation: Hall, D.G., Hentz, M.G., Stover, E.W. 2017. Field survey of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) infestations associated with six cultivars of Poncirus trifoliata. Florida Entomologist. 100:667-668.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid is an important pest because it transmits a serious disease of citrus called huanglongbing, also known as citrus greening disease. Insecticidal control of the psyllid is a key tactic used to manage the disease, but plant resistance may hold some promise as an alternative. Results of a field survey revealed relatively large infestation densities of the psyllid developed on conventional citrus but not on a closely related genotype, trifoliate orange. Reduced colonization on trifoliate orange was largely a result of reductions in numbers of eggs laid.

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid is an important pest because it transmits a bacterium responsible for huanglongbing, also known as citrus greening disease. Insecticidal control of the psyllid is a key tactic used to manage the disease, but host plant resistance may hold some promise as an alternative. Results of a field survey revealed relatively large infestation densities of the psyllid developed on conventional citrus and citrange cultivars but not on any of six Poncirus trifoliata cultivars. Poncirus trifoliata is a genotype closely related to citrus. Citranges are hybrids of Poncirus trifoliata. Reduced colonization on Poncirus trifoliata was largely a result of reduced rates of oviposition. Poncirus trifoliata resistance to oviposition may involve more than a single, simple genetic trait, as there was no reduced oviposition on four citrange cultivars studied.