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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338663

Research Project: Classical Biological Control of Insect Pests of Crops, Emphasizing Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Spotted Wing Drosophila and Tarnished Plant Bug

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Best practices for the use and exchange of invertebrate biological control genetic resources relevant for food and agriculture

Author
item MASON, P. G. - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item COCK, MATTHEW - Centre For Agriculture & Biosciences International (CABI)
item BARRATT, BARBARA - Ag Research Limited
item KLAPWIJK, JOHANNETTE - Koppert Bv
item VAN LENTEREN, JOOP - Wageningen University
item BRODEUR, JACQUES - Universite De Montreal
item Hoelmer, Kim
item HEIMPEL, GEORGE - University Of Minnesota

Submitted to: Biocontrol
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/3/2017
Publication Date: 4/21/2017
Citation: Mason, P., Cock, M., Barratt, B., Klapwijk, J., Van Lenteren, J.C., Brodeur, J., Hoelmer, K.A., Heimpel, G.E. 2017. Best practices for the use and exchange of invertebrate biological control genetic resources relevant for food and agriculture. Biocontrol. doi:10.1007/s10526-017-9810-3.

Interpretive Summary: Biological control is an environmentally preferable method for managing invasive pests and weeds. New international regulations governing exchange of genetic materials will affect the availability of candidate biocontrol agents from other countries. A system of Best Practices is necessary to ensure that the use and exchange of biological control agents continues to be fair and equitable, and will benefit both giving and receiving countries. Recommendations for Best Practices include: encouraging the exchange of information about what agents are available and where they may be obtained; sharing knowledge through public databases; engaging in cooperative research with less developed source countries; and transferring production technology to provide opportunities for small-scale economic activity.

Technical Abstract: Biological control is an important and environmentally preferred management option for invasive insect pests and weeds. Implementation of new international regulations governing exchange of genetic materials impacts the availability of candidate biocontrol agents, and exchange policies need to be carefully drafted. "Best practices" are necessary to ensure that the use and exchange of biological control agents continues to be fair and equitable, and of benefit to both source and receiving countries. The International Organization of Biological Control recommendations of Best Practice include: collaborations to encourage information exchange about what agents are available and where they may be obtained; knowledge sharing through freely available databases that document successes (and failures); cooperative research to develop local capacity in less developed source countries; and transfer of production technology to provide opportunities for small-scale economic activity.