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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338548

Research Project: Production and Processing Intervention Strategies for Poultry Associated Foodborne Pathogens

Location: Poultry Microbiological Safety & Processing Research

Title: Effect of dietary bacteriophage supplementation in internal organs, fecal excretion and ileal immune response in laying hens challenged with salmonella enteritidis

Author
item ADHIKARI, PRATIMA - University Of Georgia
item Cosby, Douglas
item Cox, Nelson - Nac
item LEE, J - Ctcbio Inc
item KIM, WOO - University Of Georgia

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/19/2017
Publication Date: 4/26/2017
Citation: Adhikari, P., Cosby, D.E., Cox Jr, N.A., Lee, J.H., Kim, W.K. 2017. Effect of dietary bacteriophage supplementation in internal organs, fecal excretion and ileal immune response in laying hens challenged with salmonella enteritidis. Poultry Science. 96(9):3264-3271. doi: 10.3382/ps/pex109.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3382/ps/pex109

Interpretive Summary: Evaluation of the role of bacteriophage against Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) colonization of internal organs (ceca, liver/gall bladder, spleen and ovaries) and the effect of ileal immune response in laying hens was studied. Results suggest that bacteriophage can be used as a dietary strategy to reduce the presence of SE in internal organs and also significantly increased the levels of interferon and interleukin in the ileum.

Technical Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the role of bacteriophage (BP) against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) internal organs colonization and ileum immune response in laying hens. Hens were challenged both orally and intracloacally with 108 cfu/mL cells of nalidixic acid resistant Salmonella Enteritidis (SENAR). Thirty-two Single Comb White Leghorns were randomly allocated to four dietary treatments; 1) unchallenged control (negative control; T1), 2) SENAR challenged control (positive control; T2), 3) SENAR challenged + 0.1% BP (T3) and 4) SENAR challenged + 0.2% BP (T4). The number of SENAR in ceca was significantly reduced by 0.2% BP supplementation (P < 0.05) at 7 days-post infection (dpi). The respective number of SENAR was reduced from 2.9 log cfu/gm in T2 and T3 to 2.0 log cfu/gm in T4. There was no significant effect of T3 on reduction of numbers of cecal SENAR. A significant reduction of SENAR (P < 0.05) was observed in liver with gall bladder (LGB) from 0.75 in T2 to 0.40 and 0.18 log cfu/gm in T3 and T4, respectively. In spleen, T4 significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the bacteria from 0.94 in both T2 and T3 to 0.56 log cfu/gm. There was no significant effect of T3 in reduction of prevalence of spleen SENAR. By supplementing 0.2% BP (T4), the SENAR in ovary was reduced to 0 log cfu/gm. There was no significant effect on fecal SENAR at 3 dpi. There was a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in fecal SENAR at 6 dpi by T4 (0.71 log cfu/gm) compared to the control (1.57 log cfu/gm). The expression levels of immune genes such as toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), interferon (IFN) –', interleukin (IL)-6, 10 and 1B were increased in the ileum by SENAR challenge as well as BP. This study suggests that BP can be used as one of the dietary strategies to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis incidence in internal organs as well as feces of laying hens.