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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Raleigh, North Carolina » Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338400

Research Project: Increasing the Competitiveness of U.S. Soybeans in Global Markets through Genetic Diversity, Genomics, and Plant Breeding

Location: Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation Research

Title: Molecular mapping and genomics of soybean seed protein: A review and perspective for the future

Author
item PATIL, GUNVANT - University Of Missouri
item Mian, Rouf
item VUONG, TRI - University Of Missouri
item PANTALONE, VINCE - University Of Tennessee
item Song, Qijian
item SHANNON, GROVER - University Of Missouri
item Carter Jr, Thomas
item CHEN, PENGYIN - University Of Missouri
item NGUYEN, HENRY - University Of Missouri

Submitted to: Journal of Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/26/2017
Publication Date: 8/11/2017
Citation: Patil, G., Mian, R.M., Vuong, T., Pantalone, V., Song, Q.J., Shannon, G., Carter Jr, T.E., Chen, P., Nguyen, H. 2017. Molecular mapping and genomics of soybean seed protein: A review and perspective for the future. Journal of Theoretical and Applied Genetics 130:(10):1975-1991. doi:10.1007/s00122-017-2955-8.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00122-017-2955-8

Interpretive Summary: Soybean meal protein is the primary source of protein (amino acids) in poultry and livestock feed and is a key factor that determines the nutritional and economical value of soybean [Glycine max (L) Merr.]. Increasing the seed protein content while maintaining a balanced amino acids profile is highly desirable. However, increasing seed protein is challenging due to its negative correlation with seed yield and seed oil. In several previous studies, major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for soybean protein were detected and repeatedly mapped on chromosomes (Chr.) 20 (LG-I), and 15 (LG-E). Yet genetic improvement of soybean seed protein quantity and quality (amino acid profile) without yield penalty continues to be a challenge to soybean breeders. Additionally, seed protein content is reduced by lower temperatures during seed development. In the present review, we discuss global perspectives of soybean protein, rate limiting factors related to protein content and nutritional quality, and potential control factors regulating seed storage protein. In addition, we describe advances in next-generation sequencing technologies for precise detection of natural variants and their integration with conventional and high-throughput technologies. Finally, we have discussed comprehensive approaches integrating the protein and amino acid QTL, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-genome resequencing (WGRS), and transcriptome data that will accelerate identification of genomic hot-spots for trait introgression and soybean meal protein improvement. This review puts together a vast amount of information regarding molecular mapping and genomics of soybean protein and suggests ways to use those information in breeding efforts to improve this highly valuable trait of soybean.

Technical Abstract: Meal protein derived from soybean [Glycine max (L) Merr.] seed is the primary source of protein in poultry and livestock feed. Protein is a key factor that determines the nutritional and economical value of soybean. Genetic improvement of soybean seed protein content is highly desirable, and major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for soybean protein have been detected and repeatedly mapped on chromosomes (Chr.) 20 (LG-I), and 15 (LG-E). However, genetic improvement of seed protein content is challenging because of its negative genetic correlation with seed yield, and other seed components such as oil and sucrose. In the present review, we discuss rate limiting factors related to soybean protein content and nutritional quality, and potential control factors regulating seed storage protein. In addition, we describe advances in next-generation sequencing technologies for precise detection of natural variants and their integration with conventional and high-throughput genotyping technologies. A syntenic analysis of QTL on Chr. 15 and 20 is presented. Finally, we discuss comprehensive approaches integrating protein and amino acid QTL, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-genome resequencing (WGRS), and analysis of transcriptome data to accelerate identification of genomic hot-spots for allele introgression and soybean meal protein improvement.