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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Systematic Entomology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338355

Research Project: Systematics of Parasitic and Herbivorous Wasps of Agricultural Importance

Location: Systematic Entomology Laboratory

Title: Seasonal parasitism and host specificity of Trissolcus japonicus in northern China

Author
item Zhang, Jinping - Center For Agricultural Bioscience International, Cabi
item Zhang, Feng - Center For Agricultural Bioscience International, Cabi
item Gariepy, Tara - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Mason, Peter - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Gillespie, Dave - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Talamas, Elijah
item Haye, Tim - Center For Agricultural Bioscience International, Cabi

Submitted to: Journal of Pest Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/7/2017
Publication Date: 4/18/2017
Citation: Zhang, J., Zhang, F., Gariepy, T., Mason, P., Gillespie, D., Talamas, E.J., Haye, T. 2017. Seasonal parasitism and host specificity of Trissolcus japonicus in northern China. Journal of Pest Science. 1:1-15.

Interpretive Summary: Parasitoid wasps are potent natural enemies of many species of pest insects. Correct identification, ecological data, and host specificity are key factors in the success of biological control. This paper determines which species of stink bugs are suitable hosts for biocontrol candidates being investigated in northern China, which is the native range of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug. The data presented in this paper will be used by other ARS scientists, extension entomologists, and biological control researchers worldwide.

Technical Abstract: The Asian egg parasitoid Trissolcus japonicus is considered the most promising species for classical biological control of Halyomorpha halys. We investigated the fundamental and ecological host range of T. japonicus in northern China to define its host specificity, and we determined that T. japonicus successfully develops on Pentatomidae other than its intended target, H. halys, under laboratory and field conditions. Negative impacts on native non-target species must be further studied to determine if the benefit outweighs the risk if T. japonicus is released outside of Asia.