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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Plant Germplasm Preservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #338170

Research Project: Innovations that Improve the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Managing and Preserving Ex Situ Plant Germplasm Collections

Location: Plant Germplasm Preservation Research

Title: Citrus genebank collections: International collaboration opportunities between the U.S. and Russia

Author
item Volk, Gayle
item Samarina, Lidiia - The All Russian Research Institute For Animal Health (ARRIAH)
item Kulyan, Raisa - The All Russian Research Institute For Animal Health (ARRIAH)
item Vyacheslav, Gorshkov - The All Russian Research Institute For Animal Health (ARRIAH)
item Malyarovskaya, Valentina - The All Russian Research Institute For Animal Health (ARRIAH)
item Ryndin, Alexey - The All Russian Research Institute For Animal Health (ARRIAH)
item Polek, Marylou
item Krueger, Robert
item Stover, Ed

Submitted to: Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/3/2017
Publication Date: 7/28/2017
Citation: Volk, G.M., Samarina, L.K., Kulyan, R., Vyacheslav, G., Malyarovskaya, V., Ryndin, A., Polek, M., Krueger, R., Stover, E.W. 2017. Citrus genebank collections: International collaboration opportunities between the U.S. and Russia. Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution. 10.1007/2107-017-0543-z.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/2107-017-0543-z

Interpretive Summary: Diverse citrus species and cultivars have been conserved in genebanks in many countries. Access to these materials in genebanks is particularly important as diseases and climate change have threatened current citrus production regions. This paper presents historical, inventory, and maintenance information about national citrus collections in Russia and in the United States. The Russian Research Institute of Floriculture and Subtropical Crops (RRIFSC) in Sochi, Russia maintains a collection of 132 citrus accessions representing 28 taxa. The satsuma mandarin and lemon accessions in the RRIFSC collection were specifically bred to have high levels of cold tolerance so that citrus can be successfully produced in Southern Russia. The collections at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates and at the University of California Citrus Variety Collection in Riverside, California, maintain 1328 accessions of citrus cultivars and wild relatives. The desert lemon and grapefruits, as well as the citrus wild relatives, are of particular significance in the USDA collection. Through collaborative exchange efforts, the diversity in the two genebanks could be expanded to offer desirable genetic resources to breeding and research communities throughout the world.

Technical Abstract: Citrus germplasm is conserved in genebanks at sites around the world to provide genetic resources for breeding and research programs. The value of genebank collections is particularly evident as diseases and climate change threaten citrus production areas. We provide historical, inventory, and maintenance information about national citrus collections in Russia and in the United States. The Russian Research Institute of Floriculture and Subtropical Crops (RRIFSC) in Sochi, Russia maintains a collection of 132 citrus accessions representing 28 taxa. Southern Russia is one of the most northerly citrus growing areas in the world and many accessions in the RRIFSC collection were specifically selected for cold tolerance to facilitate citrus production in this region. Tree response data taken during the frequent severe winters in Sochi has provided an understanding of the relative cold tolerance of many RRIFSC accessions. Particularly noteworthy is the array of cold-tolerant lemon accessions maintained at the RRIFSC. The Aurantioideae collections at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates (NCGRCD) and at the University of California Citrus Variety Collection in Riverside, California, maintain 1328 accessions of citrus cultivars and wild relatives. Because of federal and state quarantine regulations, accessions at this facility are tested for graft-transmissible pathogens and undergo therapy to eliminate known pathogens. In contrast to Sochi, desert lemon and grapefruit varieties are a primary interest of the California-based collection. The collection of citrus relatives is being screened for resistance and/or tolerance genes to diseases such as huanglongbing (HLB) which is currently threatening the U.S. citrus industry. Through collaborative exchange efforts, the diversity in the two genebanks could be expanded to increase availability of desirable genetic resources to breeding and research communities throughout the world.