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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Auburn, Alabama » Aquatic Animal Health Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #337976

Research Project: Pathogen Characterization, Host Immune Response and Development of Strategies to Reduce Losses to Disease in Aquaculture

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: Primer prueba de desafio controlado en tilapia del Nilo Para Resistencia a Streptococcus iniae

Author
item Lafrentz, Benjamin
item Lozano, Carlos - Akvaforsk Genetic Center As
item Shoemaker, Craig
item Garcia, Julio
item Xu, Dehai
item Lovoll, Marie - Veso Vikan
item Rye, Morten - Akvaforsk Genetic Center As

Submitted to: Panorama Acuicola
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/2/2017
Publication Date: 2/25/2017
Citation: Lafrentz, B.R., Lozano, C.A., Shoemaker, C.A., Garcia, J.C., Xu, D., Lovoll, M., Rye, M. 2017. Primer prueba de desafio controlado en tilapia del Nilo Para Resistencia a Streptococcus iniae. Panorama Acuicola. 22(2): p.38-41.

Interpretive Summary: Intensification of tilapia production has resulted in disease outbreaks that negatively affect commercial fish farmers. One bacterial pathogen that commonly causes losses in tilapia production is Streptococcus iniae. Control and prevention of S. iniae can be difficult and requires an integrated fish health management approach consisting of management practices, use of antibiotics, and vaccination. Selective breeding for resistance to disease is a complimentary strategy to improve health and performance in tilapia. This study was performed to determine whether resistance of tilapia to S. iniae is a heritable trait. A total of 143 families of tilapia (on average 9 fish per family) were infected with S. iniae, and the percent of fish that died for each family were determined. Two different genetic models were used to analyze the data and the results of both models revealed that resistance to S. iniae is moderately heritable indicating that it should be possible to develop an improved line of tilapia that are more resistant to disease. This report confirms the potential for selective breeding of Nile tilapia for resistance against Streptococcus iniae in the aquaculture industry and provides a complementary tool for the management of diseases in farmed fish.

Technical Abstract: Intensification of tilapia production has resulted in disease outbreaks that negatively affect commercial fish farmers. One bacterial pathogen that commonly causes losses in tilapia production is Streptococcus iniae. Control and prevention of S. iniae can be difficult and requires an integrated fish health management approach consisting of management practices, use of antibiotics, and vaccination. Selective breeding for resistance to disease is a complimentary strategy to improve health and performance in tilapia. This study was performed to determine whether resistance of tilapia to S. iniae is a heritable trait. A total of 143 families of tilapia (on average 9 fish per family) were infected with S. iniae, and the percent of fish that died for each family were determined. Two different genetic models were used to analyze the data and the results of both models revealed that resistance to S. iniae is moderately heritable indicating that it should be possible to develop an improved line of tilapia that are more resistant to disease. This report confirms the potential for selective breeding of Nile tilapia for resistance against Streptococcus iniae in the aquaculture industry and provides a complementary tool for the management of diseases in farmed fish.