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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Columbia, Missouri » Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #337245

Research Project: Long-term Management of Water Resources in the Central Mississippi River Basin

Location: Cropping Systems and Water Quality Research

Title: Evaluating the Soil Vulnerability Index (SVI), an index to characterize inherent vulnerability of croplands to runoff and leaching

Author
item Lohani, Sapana - University Of Missouri
item Baffaut, Claire
item Thompson, Allen - University Of Missouri

Submitted to: Soil and Water Conservation Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/12/2017
Publication Date: 7/31/2017
Citation: Lohani, S., Baffaut, C., Thompson, A. 2017. Evaluating the Soil Vulnerability Index (SVI), an index to characterize inherent vulnerability of croplands to runoff and leaching [abstract]. Soil and Water Conservation Society International Annual Conference, July 30-August 2, 2017, Madison, Wisconsin. p. 25.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Soil erosion and nutrient loss from surface runoff and sub-surface flows are critical problems for croplands in the United States. Assessing cropland vulnerability to runoff and leaching is needed for watershed or regional land use and land management planning and conservation resources allocation. The NRCS proposed the Soil Vulnerability Index (SVI) to identify cropland that is inherently vulnerable to runoff and leaching. The SVI for runoff is derived using a combination of soil hydrologic group, slope, and K-factor (soil erodibility factor), while SVI for leaching uses all of these and whether the soil is classified as organic. The goal of this symposium is to share and discuss the results of SVI evaluation across different physiographic and hydrogeomorphic regions within the United States. Eleven CEAP watersheds ranging from 6 to 1,048 km2 were selected for the project. Results from SVI evaluation on each of these watersheds will be presented and follow-up discussion will be moderated. The symposium will be a 90-minute session. Thirteen 5-minutes long flash-talk presentations are planned, one for each watershed, overall presentations of SVI, and statistical analysis of SVI spatial distribution and nutrient load data. The symposium is expected to discuss the potential use and limitations of SVI for categorizing soils based on inherent vulnerability to runoff and leaching. The audience can expect to learn about this simple index that can assist in identifying the most vulnerable areas, which may be in need of improved conservation and management efforts.