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ARS Home » Plains Area » Manhattan, Kansas » Center for Grain and Animal Health Research » ABADRU » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #337168

Research Project: COUNTERMEASURES TO PREVENT, MITIGATE, AND CONTROL RIFT VALLEY FEVER (RVF)

Location: Arthropod-borne Animal Diseases Research

Title: Multiplex detection of IgG and IgM to Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein, nonstructural proteins, and glycoprotein in ovine and bovine

Author
item Hossain, Mohammad - Kansas State University
item Wilson, William
item Faburay, Bonto - Kansas State University
item Richt, Juergen - Kansas State University
item Mcvey, D Scott - Scott
item Rowland, Raymond - Kansas State University

Submitted to: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/23/2016
Publication Date: 7/22/2016
Citation: Hossain, M.M., Wilson, W.C., Faburay, B., Richt, J.A., McVey, D.S., Rowland, R.R. 2016. Multiplex detection of IgG and IgM to Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein, nonstructural proteins, and glycoprotein in ovine and bovine. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. 16(8):550-557. doi:10.1089/vbz.2014.1721.

Interpretive Summary: A serological assay was used to detect bovine and ovine antibodies to several Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) proteins simultaneously. These target antigens were assembled into a multiplex format and tested in serum samples from animals infected wild-type RVFV or MP12, a modified live virus vaccine. The experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of the assay, which can be applied to future development and validation of diagnostic tests that can be used to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals.

Technical Abstract: A multiplex fluorescence microsphere immunoassay (FMIA) was used to detect bovine and ovine IgM and IgG antibodies to several Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) proteins, including the major surface glycoprotein, Gn; the nonstructural proteins, NSs and NSm; and the nucleoprotein, N. Target antigens were assembled into a multiplex and tested in serum samples from infected wild-type RVFV or MP12, a modified live virus vaccine. As expected, the N protein was immunodominant and the best target for early detection of infection. Antibody activity against the other targets was also detected. The experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of FMIA for the detection of antibodies to RVFV structural and nonstructural proteins, which can be applied to future development and validation of diagnostic tests that can be used to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals.