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ARS Home » Plains Area » Miles City, Montana » Livestock and Range Research Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336785

Research Project: Alleviating Rate Limiting Factors that Compromise Beef Production Efficiency

Location: Livestock and Range Research Laboratory

Title: Glycosylation and immunocytochemistry of binucleate cells in pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana, Antilocapridae) shows features of both Giraffidae and Bovidae

Author
item Jones, Carolyn J - University Of Manchester
item Silvia, W - University Of Kentucky
item Hamilton, C - University Of Kentucky
item Geary, Thomas
item Zezeski, Abby
item Wooding, Fbp - University Of Cambridge

Submitted to: Placenta
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/12/2017
Publication Date: 7/19/2017
Citation: Jones, C.P., Silvia, W.J., Hamilton, C.H., Geary, T.W., Zezeski, A.L., Wooding, F. 2017. Glycosylation and immunocytochemistry of binucleate cells in pronghorn (Antilocapra Americana, Antilocapridae) shows features of both Giraffidae and Bovidae. Placenta. 57:216-222. doi:10.1016/j.placenta.2017.07.011.

Interpretive Summary: Phylogenetics is the study of evolutionary relationships among species. The pronghorn antelope is native to the Western United States, but its nearest relatives are the giraffe and okapi of Africa. Pronghorn antelope resemble the antelope species from Africa and Eurasia, which are members of the bovine (cattle) family. This study examined genetic relationships between pronghorns, cattle, giraffes, and okapis using placental tissue for comparison. Tissues were collected from pregnant pronghorn antelope in Southeast Montana and compared to tissue samples collected previously from cattle, giraffes, and okapis. Our findings suggest that although the pronghorn outwardly resembles an antelope, they are more closely related to giraffes from a placental gene expression standpoint.

Technical Abstract: Although the Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) resembles an antelope, its nearest relatives are the Giraffe and Okapi. In this study we have examined the placentae of 6 pronghorns using lectin histochemistry to identify any giraffid features. Results showed that the binucleate cell (BNC) of the placenta exhibited features intermediate between those of the Giraffe and Bovine; Dolichos biflorus agglutinin binding – strong in the Bovine BNC and absent in the Giraffe – was evident in only a subpopulation of BNC while binding to blood vessels as in the Giraffe. Binding of Phytolacca americana agglutinin also resembled that of the Giraffe and Okapi whereas many other glycans were found in all four clades. PAG antigens were as in Bovine and Okapi but not Giraffe. Our findings suggest that although the pronghorn outwardly resembles an antelope, placental BNC show Giraffid features. Although each clade has its own individual characteristics, there are far more similarities than differences between them, emphasizing the common ancestry of all four clades.