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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Surveys Research Group » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336731

Research Project: What We Eat in America - Dietary Survey: Data Collection, Interpretation, Dissemination, and Methodology

Location: Food Surveys Research Group

Title: Dietary protein intake by meal type in adults aged 51 years and over: WWEIA, NHANES 2011-2012

Author
item MISHRA, SURUCHI - University Of Maryland
item Goldman, Joseph
item SAHYOUN, NADINE - University Of Maryland
item Moshfegh, Alanna

Submitted to: Journal of Food Composition and Analysis
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/7/2017
Publication Date: 7/12/2017
Citation: Mishra, S., Goldman, J.D., Sahyoun, N.R., Moshfegh, A.J. 2017. Dietary protein intake by meal types in adults aged 51 years and over: WWEIA, NHANES 2011-2012. Journal of Food Composition and Analysis. 64(Part 1 2017):93-96. https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfca.2017.07.011.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jfca.2017.07.011

Interpretive Summary: Distributing daily protein intake evenly across meals has been suggested to improve muscle mass among older adults. Using nationwide data on dietary intakes from What We Eat in America, NHANES 2011-2012, this study examined daily protein intake, protein intake at three meal types (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), and proportion of individuals consuming at least 25g protein per meal type and across all three meal types among adults aged 51 years and older. Men had higher daily protein intake then women. Regardless of gender, most protein was consumed at dinner. Over half of the men and one-third women consumed at least 25g protein at lunch and dinner, however one in six men and only one in 20 women consumed at least 25g protein at breakfast. Only 8% of men and 1% of women had protein intake of at least 25g at each of the breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

Technical Abstract: Evenly distributing daily protein intake at meals has been suggested to improve muscle mass among older adults. The aim of this research is to evaluate protein intake and its distribution across three meal types (breakfast, lunch, and dinner). Nationally representative dietary intake data of adults aged 51 years and older who reported consuming breakfast, lunch, and dinner on the intake day from What We Eat in America, NHANES 2011-2012 were analyzed. Total mean daily protein intake and protein intake per meal type were determined. The proportion of individuals consuming at least 25g protein per meal type and across all three meal types was estimated. Of men and women aged 51 years and over, 64% and 71% consumed three meal types on the intake day, respectively. Men had significantly higher mean daily protein intake than women (84.4±2.33g vs. 60.9±1.21g, p<0.0001). Regardless of gender, dinner contributed most protein by meal type. Among reporters of the three meal types, 17, 55, and 73% of men and 5, 36, and 53% of women consumed at least 25g protein at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively. Only 8% of men and 1% of women had protein intake of at least 25g at each of the three meal types.