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ARS Home » Plains Area » Stillwater, Oklahoma » Wheat, Peanut, and Other Field Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336434

Research Project: Identification, Characterization, and Development of Insect-Resistant Wheat, Barley, and Sorghum Germplasm

Location: Wheat, Peanut, and Other Field Crops Research

Title: Host plant defense against sugarcane aphid in sorghum and genetic mechanism of resistance to the new pest

Author
item Huang, Yinghua

Submitted to: International Congress of Entomology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/14/2016
Publication Date: 9/29/2016
Citation: Huang, Y. 2016. Host plant defense against sugarcane aphid in sorghum and genetic mechanism of resistance to the new pest [abstract]. 2016 XXV International Congress of Entomology; September 25-30, 2016, Orlando, FL. #3380.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Sugarcane aphid (SCA), Melanaphis sacchari (Zerhntner), is typically known as a key pest to sorghum and sugarcane in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. In 2013, this new invasive pest was found on grain sorghum plants in South and East Texas, and now it has already spread over 17 states and 417 counties of the U.S. and has become a significant threat to sorghum production. Host plant resistance should form the backbone of the pest management in sorghum. To better manage sugarcane aphids, a core collection of the U.S. sorghum germplasm has been evaluated with this new pest. The newly identified resistant sources are being characterized to determine the genetic control of the host resistance. Then, sources of the resistance have been crossed into adapted sorghum lines or breeding materials; thus several populations have been developed for either breeding SCA-resistant sorghum and/or mapping the resistance genes in sorghum. A number of sorghum germplasm lines with resistance to SCA were identified. The newly identified sources of the SCA resistance have been used in our breeding program to develop SCA-resistant varieties. Furthermore, molecular mapping with one of the sorghum populations is being genotyped towards both the placement of the QTLs on sorghum chromosomes and the identification of genetic control of sugarcane resistance in sorghum.