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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336321

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Prevent and Control Disease Outbreaks Caused by Emerging Strains of Avian Influenza Viruses

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Characterization of a new bacteria, Ochrobactrum sp., as a co-infectant with Newcastle disease virus in chickens experiencing high mortality

Author
item Swayne, David
item Killmaster, Lindsay
item Sharma, Poonam - Orise Fellow
item Afonso, Claudio

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/1/2017
Publication Date: 7/21/2017
Citation: Swayne, D.E., Killmaster, L.F., Sharma, P., Afonso, C.L. 2017. Characterization of a new bacteria, Ochrobactrum sp., as a co-infectant with Newcastle disease virus in chickens experiencing high mortality [abstract]. The American Association of Avian Pathologists, July 21-25, 2017, Indianapolis, Indiana. 2017 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Virulent Newcastle disease virus and a new bacterial species were isolated from eight oral swabs obtained from chickens, pigeons and a domestic duck in Nigeria and Pakistan that were experiencing high mortality. Bacterial samples were streaked on solid media (TSA or Farrell’s) for colony isolation and incubated overnight at 37°C. Initial characterization of the bacterial 16s ribosomal RNA showed a close genetic relationship with Ochrobactrum spp. and, slightly less relatedness to Brucella spp. Ochrobactrum spp are mostly soil microbes with one species being associated with opportunistic infections in humans, while Brucella spp. are virulent and cause significant mortality and morbidity in animals with substantial economic impact on the agricultural industries. All eight bacterial isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, including Ampicillin, Aztreonam, Amoxicillin/Clavulinic acid, Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone, and Gentamicin, but were susceptible to Doxycycline and Imipenem. Intermediate sensitivity was observed for Amikacin and Rifampin. Susceptibility to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole and Ciprofloxacin varied by geographic location. Intranasal challenge studies have been initiated in young chickens to ascertain the pathogenicity and pathogenesis of infections with the new bacterial species and will be reported.