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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Commodity Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336081

Research Project: Increasing the Value of Cottonseed

Location: Commodity Utilization Research

Title: Chemical characterization of cotton plant parts for multiple uses

Author
item He, Zhongqi
item Zhang, Hailin - Oklahoma State University
item Tewolde, Haile
item Shankle, Mark - Mississippi State University

Submitted to: Agricultural and Environmental Letters
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/22/2016
Publication Date: 1/19/2017
Citation: He, Z., Zhang, H., Tewolde, H., Shankle, M. 2017. Chemical characterization of cotton plant parts for multiple uses. Agricultural and Environmental Letters. 2:110044-110049. doi:10.2134/ael2016.11.0044.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton is America’s number one high-value crop, with its primary production areas located in the southern and southeastern US. In this study, field-grown whole cotton plants collected at mid-season and just before defoliation were analyzed for chemical composition in roots, main stems, branches, petioles, leaf blades, and reproductive parts (burs, peduncles, and seeds). The contents of macro and trace elements, protein, fiber, and lignin in these biomass materials were determined. Growth stages affected the relative contents of some, but not all, the measured parameters. Regression analysis of the measured data revealed that some of the parameters were well related to each other, but others were quite independent. The information reported in this work improved the understanding of chemical ingredient accumulation over cotton plant growth and development, and would be helpful in exploring and optimizing management practices and processing strategies for best utilization of these cotton crop biomass materials as renewable natural resources.

Technical Abstract: Cotton is an important crop in the southern and southeastern parts of USA, but cotton plant residues are under utilized. In this study, whole cotton plants were collected at mid season and just before harvest and chemically characterized to explore multiple uses. These plant samples were separated into six (mid season) or eight (pre-defoliation for harvest) biomass fractions. The contents of macro and trace elements, protein, fiber, and lignin in these biomass materials were determined. Growth stages affected the relative contents of some, but not all, the measured parameters. Regression analysis of the measured data revealed that some of the parameters were well related to each other, but others were quite independent. The information reported in this work would be helpful in exploring and optimizing management practices and processing strategies for best utilization of these cotton crop biomass materials as renewable natural resources.