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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335574

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Effects of cooking techniques on fatty acid and oxylipin content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Author
item Flaskerud, Katrina - University Of Minnesota
item Bukowski, Michael
item Golovko, Mikhail - University Of North Dakota
item Johnson, Luann - University Of North Dakota
item Brose, Stephen - University Of North Dakota
item Ali, Ashrifa - University Of North Dakota
item Cleveland, Beth
item Picklo, Matthew
item Raatz, Susan

Submitted to: Food Science and Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/11/2017
Publication Date: 8/28/2017
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5852203
Citation: Flaskerud, K., Bukowski, M.R., Golovko, M., Johnson, L.K., Brose, S., Ali, A., Cleveland, B.M., Picklo, M.J., Raatz, S.K. 2017. Effects of cooking techniques on fatty acid and oxylipin content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Food Science and Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.512.

Interpretive Summary: Rainbow trout is an excellent source of long chain omega-3 fatty acids which have beneficial health effects. In this work, we determined whether the type of cooking method changed the amounts of omega-3 PUFA, other fatty acids and oxidized fatty acid products in rainbow trout fillets. Trout fillets were baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in corn oil, canola oil, peanut oil, or high-oleic sunflower oil. PUFA content was not altered when samples were baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in corn or canola oil. Pan-frying in peanut oil and high-oleic sunflower oil reduced various fatty acids compared to raw fish. Cooking decreased oxidation products from omega-6 fatty acids but not those from omega 3 fatty acids. Overall, pan-frying was the only cooking method to alter the fatty acid content of the fillets. Observed changes in fatty acid oxidation varied by cooking method.

Technical Abstract: Rainbow trout is an excellent source of long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) which have beneficial health effects. We determined the fatty acid and oxylipin content of 2-year old rainbow trout fillets that were raw, baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in corn (CO), canola (CaO), peanut (PO), or high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSO). PUFA content was not altered when samples were baked, broiled, microwaved, or pan-fried in CO or CaO. Pan-frying in PO reduced 18:3n-3, 20:2n-6, and 20:3n-6 while pan-frying in HOSO reduced: 18:3n-3, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3, 22:6n-3, 18:2n-6,18:3n-6, 20:2n-6, 20:3n-6, 22:2n-6, and 22:4n-6 compared to raw fish. Cooking decreased the omega-6 PUFA derived oxylipins, but caused no change in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid derived oxylipins of the fillet. Overall, pan-frying was the only cooking method to alter the fatty acid content of the fillets. Observed changes in oxylipin content varied by cooking method.