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ARS Home » Plains Area » Sidney, Montana » Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory » Pest Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335136

Research Project: Ecology and Management of Grasshoppers and Other Rangeland and Crop Insects in the Great Plains

Location: Pest Management Research

Title: Host plants of the wheat stem sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae)

Author
item Cockrell, Darren - Colorado State University
item Griffin-nolan, Robert - Colorad0 State University
item Rand, Tatyana
item Altilmisani, Altilmisani - Colorad0 State University
item Ode, Paul - Colorado State University
item Peairs, Frank - Colorado State University

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/7/2017
Publication Date: 6/7/2017
Citation: Cockrell, D.M., Griffin-Nolan, R.J., Rand, T.A., Altilmisani, A., Ode, P., Peairs, F. 2017. Host plants of the wheat stem sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae). Environmental Entomology. doi:10.1093/ee/nvx104.

Interpretive Summary: Wheat stem sawfly is a pest of economic importance across much of the wheat cultivating areas of the western Great Plains as well as an ecologically important insect due to its wide range of grass hosts. Little research has been published involving the native host preference of the sawfly or its role as an insect of ecological importance in grassland systems. Knowledge of the complete host range of C. cinctus could inform research on new sources of genetic resistance, improve understanding of the biology and spread of natural enemies, and better define this insect’s role in grassland and agricultural systems. The aim of this review is to compile a checklist of reported host plants of C. cinctus and present data from both an extensive and intensive survey of non-cultivated hosts used by C. cinctus. These data can be used for pursuing questions regarding new sources of resistance in non-cultivated grasses.

Technical Abstract: Wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus Norton) is a pest of economic importance across much of the wheat cultivating areas of the western Great Plains as well as an ecologically important insect due to its wide range of grass hosts. Little research has been published involving the native host preference of the pest or its function as an insect of ecological importance in grassland systems. Knowledge of the complete host range of C. cinctus could inform research on new sources of genetic resistance, improve understanding of the biology and spread of natural enemies, and better define this insect’s role in grassland and agricultural systems. The aim of this review is to compile a checklist of reported host plants of C. cinctus and present data from both an extensive and intensive survey of non-cultivated hosts used by C. cinctus. These data can be used for pursuing questions regarding new sources of resistance in non-cultivated grasses.