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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Washington, D.C. » National Arboretum » Floral and Nursery Plants Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #334534

Research Project: Taxonomy of Landscape Trees and Shrubs

Location: Floral and Nursery Plants Research

Title: Typification of infrageneric names in Ulmus L.

Author
item Whittemore, Alan

Submitted to: Phytotaxa
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/9/2017
Publication Date: 2/28/2017
Citation: Whittemore, A.T. 2017. Typification of infrageneric names in Ulmus L.. Phytotaxa. 297:291-294.

Interpretive Summary: The elms are one of the most important tree crops for the $4.7 billion per year U.S. nursery industry, but utilization of these plants has been limited in recent decades by introduced diseases, especially Dutch elm disease. Research and breeding for disease resistance have been based on a small number of species, but many other species have become available to American researchers in recent years. As part of a research program to study relationships among elm species newly available to the American landscape industry, the subgenera and sections of the genus need to be re-defined, and a stable nomenclature is needed to ensure that communication among scientists is clear and accurate. This contribution reviews all the names that have been published for subdivisions of the genus Ulmus (elms), and provides clear definition in cases where this has not yet been done. This contribution will ensure that communication about these plants is based on clearly defined nomenclature, so researchers and breeders are able to share results without misunderstanding. This, in turn, will benefit geneticists and tree breeders working on elms.

Technical Abstract: The elms (the genus Ulmus) are one of the most important tree crops for the $4.7billion per year U.S. nursery industry, but utilization of these plants has been limited in recent decades by introduced diseases, especially Dutch elm disease. Research and breeding for disease resistance have been based on a small number of species, but much additional germplasm has become available to American researchers in recent years. As part of a research program to study relationships among elm species newly available to the American landscape industry, the subgenera and sections of the genus need to be re-defined, and a stable nomenclature is needed to ensure that communication among scientists is clear and accurate. This contribution reviews all the names that have been published for subdivisions of the genus Ulmus (elms), and provides clear typification in cases where this has not yet been done. This contribution will ensure that communication about these plants is based on clearly defined nomenclature, so researchers and breeders are able to share results without misunderstanding.