Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Griffin, Georgia » Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #333506

Research Project: Conservation, Characterization, and Evaluation of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Establishment of the U.S. castor (Ricinus communis L.) core collection using seed chemical composition analysis and genotyping with EST-SSR markers

Author
item Wang, Ming
item Morris, John - Brad
item Dzievit, Matt - Iowa State University
item Tonnis, Brandon
item Pinnow, David
item Chen, Zhenbang - University Of Georgia
item Yu, Jianming - Iowa State University
item Pederson, Gary

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/16/2016
Publication Date: 1/13/2017
Citation: Wang, M.L., Morris, J.B., Dzievit, M., Tonnis, B.D., Pinnow, D.L., Chen, Z., Yu, J., Pederson, G.A. 2017. Establishment of the U.S. castor (Ricinus communis L.) core collection using seed chemical composition analysis and genotyping with EST-SSR markers. Plant and Animal Genome. [Abstract] Paper No. P0118.

Interpretive Summary: Natural genetic variation exists in the plant germplasm collections. Normally the germplasm collection for a specific species encompasses many accessions. Due to its large number of accessions, the entire collection is hard to handle and can’t be easily utilized. To facilitate the end-users, traditionally a core or mini-core (representing 10% or 1% of the entire collection, respectively) will be established using morphological characters from the field records and observation. Since field planting, observation, recording, and harvesting are involved, this method is labor intensive and time consuming. Here we took integrated approaches for establishment of the U.S. castor core collection: (1) analysis of the seed chemical composition (oil content and fatty acid composition) of the entire collection (1033 accessions); (2) according to the sample distribution of oil content and fatty acid composition plus referencing geographic origins, selection of over 50% of the entire collection (574 accessions) for genotyping with EST-SSR markers; (3) based on the results of genetic analysis (subpopulation structure, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis), over 20% of the entire collection (230 accessions) were selected for field observation; and (4) from the variation of the field morphological and agronomic traits, 103 accessions (10% of the entire collection) will be selected as the core collection. The results will be presented and discussed. Our approaches may be an economic and efficient method to establish core collections.

Technical Abstract: Natural genetic variation exists in the plant germplasm collections. Normally the germplasm collection for a specific species encompasses many accessions. Due to its large number of accessions, the entire collection is hard to handle and can’t be easily utilized. To facilitate the end-users (such as breeders), traditionally a core or mini-core (representing 10% or 1% of the entire collection, respectively) will be established using morphological characters from the field records and observation. Since field planting, observation, recording, and harvesting are involved, this method is labor intensive and time consuming. Here we took integrated approaches for establishment of the U.S. castor core collection: (1) analysis of the seed chemical composition (oil content and fatty acid composition) of the entire collection (1033 accessions); (2) according to the sample distribution of oil content and fatty acid composition plus referencing geographic origins, selection of over 50% of the entire collection (574 accessions) for genotyping with EST-SSR markers; (3) based on the results of genetic analysis (subpopulation structure, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis), over 20% of the entire collection (230 accessions) were selected for field observation; and (4) from the variation of the field morphological and agronomic traits, 103 accessions (10% of the entire collection) will be selected as the core collection. The results will be presented and discussed. Our approaches may be an economic and efficient method to establish core collections.