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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Orono, Maine » National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #333323

Research Project: Genetic Improvement Of Marine Fish and Shellfish

Location: National Cold Water Marine Aquaculture Center

Title: Effects feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, fillet yeild, and body composition of rainbow trout, nile, tilapia, and channel catfish

Author
item Peterson, Brian
item Small, Brian - Hagerman Fish Station
item Sealey, Wendy - U.s. Fish And Wildlife Service
item Bosworth, Brian
item Li, Menghe - Thad Cochran National Warmwater Aquaculture Center
item Endris, Richard - Endris Consulting

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/15/2016
Publication Date: 2/19/2017
Citation: Peterson, B.C., Small, B.C., Sealey, W.M., Bosworth, B.G., Li, M.H., Endris, R.G. 2017. Effects feeding zilpaterol hydrochloride on growth performance, fillet yeild, and body composition of rainbow trout, nile, tilapia, and channel catfish. Abstract, Aquaculture America 2017. San Antonio, TX February 19-22, 2017.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) is a potent ß-adrenergic agonist (BAA) that has been used in feedlot cattle to increase average daily gain, feed efficiency, yield of trimmed cuts, and dress out percent. While positive effects of ZH have been observed in cattle, there have been no reports of this product being tested in fish. Three separate studies were conducted in rainbow trout (528.0 g), Nile tilapia (423.0 g), and channel catfish (245.2 g) to evaluate the effects ZH on growth performance, survival, dress out percent, and fillet composition. The three species of fish were fed ZH at 0, 1, 5, and 10 ppm for approximately 30 days. Results showed that weight gain was significantly reduced in catfish fed ZH at 1 ppm while weight gain was not significantly affected by ZH treatment in rainbow trout and tilapia. Feed conversion ratio, food intake, and survival were similar among treatments in all species of fish. Dress out percent was similar among all treatments for both rainbow trout and channel catfish while dress out percent was lower in tilapia fed the 5 ppm diet. Fillet proximate composition and visceral fat percent were not significantly affected by ZH treatment in any of the three species of fish. There was no qualitative behavior differences observed among treatments for any of the species tested. The observed lack of differences in growth performance and condition traits suggests there is no benefit to feeding rainbow trout, Nile tilapia, or channel catfish ZH. Dose of ZH, number of days on feed, and age of fish may play important roles in how fish respond to BAAs. Further research is needed to fully evaluate their efficacy for use in aquaculture.