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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #333067

Research Project: Exotic Whitefly Pests of Vegetables and Ornamental Plants

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Feltiella acarisuga (predatory gall midge)

Author
item Osborne, Ryan - University Of Florida
item Kumar, Vivek - University Of Florida
item Leppla, Norman - University Of Florida
item Mckenzie, Cindy
item Osborne, Lance - University Of Florida

Submitted to: Extension Publications
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/20/2016
Publication Date: 8/5/2016
Citation: Osborne, R.S., Kumar, V., Leppla, N., McKenzie, C.L., Osborne, L.S. 2016. Feltiella acarisuga (pradatory gall midge). Featured Creatured. University of Florida - Institute of Food & Agriculture Science Extension Publication.. EDIS# EENY 269

Interpretive Summary: The predatory gall midge, Feltiella acarisuga is one of the most effective and widespread natural enemies of spider mites. Because of their flying and prey detecting capabilities, and high feeding potential, it is considered an important natural enemy of the two-spotted spider mite in a number of cropping systems. It is also known to feed on other pest mites, including brown almond mite, carmine spider mite, and European red mite. Feltiella acarisuga is more mobile as an adult than is the predatory mite and, once established, eats at least five times as many spider mites. In this extension article we have summarized the important information about this biocontrol agent that would encourage their adoption and integration in the management program of pest mites by the horticultural growers.

Technical Abstract: The predatory gall midge, Feltiella acarisuga is one of the most effective and widespread natural enemies of spider mites. Because of their flying and prey detecting capabilities, and high feeding potential, it is considered an important natural enemy of the two-spotted spider mite in a number of cropping systems. It is also known to feed on other pest mites, including brown almond mite, carmine spider mite, and European red mite. Feltiella acarisuga is more mobile as an adult than is the predatory mite and, once established, eats at least five times as many spider mites. In this extension article we have summarized the important information about this biocontrol agent that would encourage their adoption and integration in the management program of pest mites by the horticultural growers.