Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332887

Research Project: Enhanced Disease and Abiotic Stress Resistance in Edible Legumes

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Tuber resistance and slow rotting characteristics of potato clones associated with the Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project to the US-24 clonal lineage of Phytophthora infestans

Author
item Porter, Lyndon
item Brown, Charles - Chuck
item Jansky, Shelley
item JOHNSON, DENNIS - Washington State University
item DUNG, JERIMIAH - Oregon State University

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/13/2016
Publication Date: 4/1/2017
Citation: Porter, L., Brown, C.R., Jansky, S.H., Johnson, D., Dung, J. 2017. Tuber resistance and slow rotting characteristics of potato clones associated with the Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project to the US-24 clonal lineage of Phytophthora infestans. American Journal of Potato Research. 94:160-172.

Interpretive Summary: Late blight, caused by a fungal-like pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease on potato worldwide and new strains of the pathogen continue to develop in the U.S. Breeding for resistance is important for economic and environmental purposes. This research assessed over two hundred different types of potato varieties for tuber resistance to the most recent strain of this pathogen on potatoes grown in Washington and Wisconsin in 2011. This is the first time these potatoes have been evaluated for resistance to late blight using a natural means of inoculating the tubers, instead of creating a wound and placing spores on the wounded tissue. Varieties with a percent incidence of infection of 30% or less were considered resistant and only eight varieties (Palisade Russet, AWN86514-2, MSL268-D, MSM171-A, MSM182-1, MSN230-1RY, Patagonia and Yukon Gem) were characterized as resistant at both locations. These varieties have previously demonstrated high to moderate foliar resistance to different strains of P.infestans and therefore represent varieties with both foliar and tuber resistance. Nine varieties (AWN86514-2, F66041, MN 18747, MSM 182-1, MSN230-1RY, Modoc, Ama-Rosa, Patagonia and Purple Majesty), were characterized as slow-rotting at both locations with a mean percent internal rot of 75% or less after 33 days of storage. Two varieties, MN 18747 and Modoc, are considered to have the highest risk of being a carrier of P. infestans in tuber tissue of all the varieties evaluated. Not a single variety demonstrated complete tuber resistance to the new strain of the pathogen at both locations. This research will be used to improve the resistance of existing potato varieties to late blight tuber rot in potato breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease on potato worldwide and new lineages of the pathogen continue to develop in the U.S. Breeding for resistance is important for economic and environmental purposes. The Solanaceae Coordinated Agricultural Project (SolCAP) focuses on linking allelic variation in genes to valuable traits in elite cultivated potato germplasm. This research assessed the SolCAP diversity panel (206 clones in Washington and 213 clones in Wisconsin) for tuber resistance to the US-24 clonal lineage of P. infestans after potatoes were harvested from fields in Washington and Wisconsin in 2011. This is the first time this germplasm has been evaluated for tuber resistance to P. infestans using a non-intrusive zoospore inoculation technique. Clones with a percent incidence of 30% or less were considered resistant and only eight clones (Palisade Russet, AWN86514-2, MSL268-D, MSM171-A, MSM182-1, MSN230-1RY, Patagonia and Yukon Gem) were characterized as resistant at both locations. These clones have previously demonstrated high to moderate partial foliar resistance to isolates of P.infestans and therefore represent germplasm with both foliar and tuber resistance. Nine clones (AWN86514-2, F66041, MN 18747, MSM 182-1, MSN230-1RY, Modoc, Ama-Rosa, Patagonia and Purple Majesty), were characterized as slow-rotting at both locations with a mean percent internal rot of 75% or less after 33 days of storage. Two clones, MN 18747 and Modoc, are considered to have the highest risk of being a vector for P. infestans of all the clones evaluated in the SolCAP collection. Not a single clone demonstrated complete tuber resistance to the US-24 strain at both locations.