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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Animal Biosciences & Biotechnology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332815

Research Project: DEVELOPING GENETIC BIOTECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREASED FOOD ANIMAL PRODUCTION, INCLUDING NOVEL ANTIMICROBIALS FOR IMPROVED HEALTH & PRODUCT SAFETY

Location: Animal Biosciences & Biotechnology Laboratory

Title: Engineering genomes of domestic pigs for agricultural applications

Author
item Park, Ki-eun - University Of Maryland
item Park, Chi-hun - University Of Maryland
item Powell, Anne
item Donovan, David
item Telugu, Bhanu - University Of Maryland

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/2/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The breeding of domestic animals has a longstanding and successful history, starting with domestication several thousand years ago. Modern animal breeding strategies predominantly based on population genetics, artificial insemination (AI) and embryo transfer (ET) technologies have led to significant increases in the performance of domestic animals, and are the basis for regular supply of high quality animal derived food at acceptable prices. However, the current strategy of marker- assisted selection and breeding of animals to introduce novel traits over multiple generations is too pedestrian in responding to unprecedented challenges such as changing climate, global pandemics, and feeding an anticipated 33% increase in global population in the next three decades. Here, we propose site-specific genome editing technologies as a basis for “directed” or “rational selection” of agricultural traits. These genome editing tools are expected to facilitate targeted modification of individual traits without affecting the overall genetic merit of the animal thereby ushering the animal biotechnology into the functional genomics era. The animal science community envisions these technologies as essential tools in addressing critical priorities for global food security and environmental sustainability, and strives to develop these technologies for maximum societal benefit. This work is supported by funding from NIH-NIFA Dual purpose with Dual Benefit Grant # 2015-67015-22845 to BT.