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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Corvallis, Oregon » Horticultural Crops Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332782

Research Project: Integrated Water and Nutrient Management Systems for Sustainable and High-Quality Production of Temperate Fruit and Nursery Crops

Location: Horticultural Crops Research Unit

Title: Specialty fruit production in the Pacific Northwest: Adaptation strategies for a changing climate

Author
item HOUSTON, LAURIE - Oregon State University
item CAPALBO, SUSAN - Oregon State University
item SEAVERT, CLARK - Oregon State University
item DALTON, MEGHAN - Oregon State University
item Bryla, David
item SAGILI, RAMESH - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Climatic Change
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/14/2017
Publication Date: 1/1/2018
Citation: Houston, L.L., Capalbo, S., Seavert, C., Dalton, M., Bryla, D.R., Sagili, R. 2018. Specialty fruit production in the Pacific Northwest: Adaptation strategies for a changing climate. Climatic Change. 146(1-2):159-171. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-017-1951-y.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-017-1951-y

Interpretive Summary: Specialty crops, defined by the USDA as fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture, represent a substantial portion of agricultural production in the Pacific Northwest. Climate change may threaten water sources, lengthen the dry season, raise temperatures during both the winter chilling period and the growing season, and facilitate the spread of fungal diseases and insect pests. Such changes have the potential to substantially impact reduce net returns due to increased input costs and altered yields and product quality. This manuscript highlights climate impacts and explores various adaptation strategies to a changed climate in the fruit-growing regions of the Pacific Northwest.

Technical Abstract: Specialty crops, defined by the USDA as fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits and horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture, represent a substantial portion of agricultural production in the Pacific Northwest. Climate change may threaten water sources, lengthen the dry season, raise temperatures during both the winter chilling period and the growing season, and facilitate the spread of fungal diseases and insect pests. Such changes have the potential to substantially impact reduce net returns due to increased input costs and altered yields and product quality. This manuscript highlights climate impacts and explores various adaptation strategies to a changed climate in the fruit-growing regions of the Pacific Northwest.